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Robin Hoods or thieves? A Foucauldian analysis of international trade policies regarding software piracy
Unformatted Document Text:  Foucauldian analysis of international trade policies 3 Introduction “Trade issues have been debated since the start of European expansionism, and since Adam Smith (1776), unrestricted cross-border trade has been widely regarded by economists as the natural, and certainly preferable, order of things” (Dunkley, 2000, p. 20). Dunkley points out that for the majority of human history, trade has tangential to community-centered activities, comprising only a small part of the economy until the twentieth century. “Only with the Industrial Revolution and incipient internationalization did trade and other international transactions come to dominate whole societies” (Dunkley, 2000, p. 19). Dunkley (2000) continues, “Many modern Free Trade theorists tend to believe that free trade could be the natural order of things if only sectional interests were tamed and the public were given adequate information about its virtues” (p. 20). Some of the driving forces behind globalization support these ideas. Henderson (1999) suggests two forces are technology and deregulation: Globalization today involves the increasing interdependence of national economies, financial markets, trade, corporations, production, distribution, and consumer marketing … [First] technology which has accelerated innovation[s] … second … the fifteen-year wave of deregulation, privatization, liberalization of capital flows, opening of national economies, extension of global trade, and … export-led growth policies.” (p. 1) Globalization, as Henderson (1999) suggests, is dominated by the interests of and the economic paradigm supported and promoted by “the United States, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and their dominant schools of academic economists on both sides of the Atlantic” (p. 1).

Authors: Malyshev, Yuri. and Hamilton, Ann.
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Foucauldian analysis of international trade policies 3
Introduction
“Trade issues have been debated since the start of European expansionism, and
since Adam Smith (1776), unrestricted cross-border trade has been widely regarded by
economists as the natural, and certainly preferable, order of things” (Dunkley, 2000, p. 20).
Dunkley points out that for the majority of human history, trade has tangential to
community-centered activities, comprising only a small part of the economy until the
twentieth century. “Only with the Industrial Revolution and incipient internationalization
did trade and other international transactions come to dominate whole societies” (Dunkley,
2000, p. 19). Dunkley (2000) continues, “Many modern Free Trade theorists tend to
believe that free trade could be the natural order of things if only sectional interests were
tamed and the public were given adequate information about its virtues” (p. 20).
Some of the driving forces behind globalization support these ideas. Henderson
(1999) suggests two forces are technology and deregulation:
Globalization today involves the increasing interdependence of national
economies, financial markets, trade, corporations, production, distribution,
and consumer marketing … [First] technology which has accelerated
innovation[s] … second … the fifteen-year wave of deregulation,
privatization, liberalization of capital flows, opening of national
economies, extension of global trade, and … export-led growth policies.”
(p. 1)

Globalization, as Henderson (1999) suggests, is dominated by the interests of and
the economic paradigm supported and promoted by “the United States, the World Bank,
the International Monetary Fund, and their dominant schools of academic economists on
both sides of the Atlantic” (p. 1).


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