All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Robin Hoods or thieves? A Foucauldian analysis of international trade policies regarding software piracy
Unformatted Document Text:  Foucauldian analysis of international trade policies 4 The global piracy rate of computer software has increased to 37 percent, with losses of $11.8 billion claimed by copyright holders (BSA, May 2001). Therefore, this is a rather substantial problem for consideration, and one that the system of international trade agreements has not been able to solve. As the analysis will show, the participants and policy makers often do not address the international goals when forming policy (i.e., they approach the tasks from a position of self-interest to the detriment of mutual-interest solutions). Further, one of the fundamental missions of all the organizations regulating international trade throughout the development of the system and in contemporary time, the mission of protecting poor countries, has not been met, as mentioned and as will be shown in the situations presented here. It is somewhat puzzling to see corporations attempting to eliminate what they have labeled “piracy,” when these activities are highly successful in disseminating their products. It would appear reasonable, as the data will show, for corporations to license local manufactures to produce and distribute their products in local markets at a fair (market-sensitive) price. This would allow greater control over the local markets and decriminalize whole sectors of local economies, which in turn might lower levels of corruption. And as local economies grow and improve, it is reasonable to presume, based on dissemination of innovations historically, that revenues would also increase over time. Such positive, rather than prosecutorial, involvement by (particularly) U.S. government and corporation representatives may also provide greater leverage to positively influence the legal environment in those countries (See Delio, 2002, Jan 22, for discussion of prosecutorial efforts). For example, one analyst says that Bulgaria was formerly the biggest

Authors: Malyshev, Yuri. and Hamilton, Ann.
first   previous   Page 4 of 34   next   last



background image
Foucauldian analysis of international trade policies 4
The global piracy rate of computer software has increased to 37 percent, with losses
of $11.8 billion claimed by copyright holders (BSA, May 2001). Therefore, this is a rather
substantial problem for consideration, and one that the system of international trade
agreements has not been able to solve. As the analysis will show, the participants and
policy makers often do not address the international goals when forming policy (i.e., they
approach the tasks from a position of self-interest to the detriment of mutual-interest
solutions). Further, one of the fundamental missions of all the organizations regulating
international trade throughout the development of the system and in contemporary time,
the mission of protecting poor countries, has not been met, as mentioned and as will be
shown in the situations presented here.
It is somewhat puzzling to see corporations attempting to eliminate what they have
labeled “piracy,” when these activities are highly successful in disseminating their
products. It would appear reasonable, as the data will show, for corporations to license
local manufactures to produce and distribute their products in local markets at a fair
(market-sensitive) price. This would allow greater control over the local markets and
decriminalize whole sectors of local economies, which in turn might lower levels of
corruption. And as local economies grow and improve, it is reasonable to presume, based
on dissemination of innovations historically, that revenues would also increase over time.
Such positive, rather than prosecutorial, involvement by (particularly) U.S. government
and corporation representatives may also provide greater leverage to positively influence
the legal environment in those countries (See Delio, 2002, Jan 22, for discussion of
prosecutorial efforts). For example, one analyst says that Bulgaria was formerly the biggest


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 34   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.