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Gender schematicity, gender identity salience, and gender-linked language use
Unformatted Document Text:  Gender schematicity, identity salience, and -linked language use 10 Reported identity salience measures. Measures of GIS and student identity salience were used. Two questions tapped GIS on seven-point scales (1 = not at all; 7 = very): “After reading the passage, how much are you thinking about being a male or a female?”; “After reading the passage, to what extent are you evaluating yourself, positively or negatively, in terms of your gender?” Two questions measured student identity salience also on seven-point scales (1 = not at all; 7 = very): “After reading the passage, to what extent are you assessing (i.e., evaluating, appreciating) yourself as a UCSB student?”; “After reading the passage, how much is being a UCSB student foremost in your thoughts?” A third forced-choice question was used to measure GIS and student identity salience simultaneously, asking “After reading the passage, which aspect of yourself are you thinking about the most?” The four choices, of which participants’ chose one as their response to the question, were: “I’m thinking most about my gender (that I’m a male or female);” “I’m thinking most about my being a UCSB student;” “I’m thinking both about my gender and being a UCSB student;” and “I’m thinking about some other part of myself but not about my gender or being a UCSB student.” This forced choice question was linearly transformed into two dichotomous “seven-point” scale variables—one for student identity salience and the other for GIS—marking the occurrence or lack thereof of high GIS and of high student identity salience, respectively. 3 Five filler questions, used to submerge the gender and student identity focus of the investigation (and not used in the analyses), asked the extent to which participants were thinking about being a member of various other groups (on seven-point scales; 1 = not at all; 7 = very): “being a resident of the County of Santa Barbara;” “ethnicity;” “being a Californian;” “being your parents’ son or daughter;” “age.” These questions were interspersed with the other questions to make the purpose of the investigation less apparent to participants. The three specific GIS measures, when combined and placed on a seven-point scale, formed a very reliable measure of reported GIS, M = 3.98, SD = 2.07, = .94. The three student identity salience measures, when combined and placed on a seven-point scale, also formed a very reliable

Authors: Palomares, Nicholas.
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Gender schematicity, identity salience, and -linked language use
10
Reported identity salience measures. Measures of GIS and student identity salience were
used. Two questions tapped GIS on seven-point scales (1 = not at all; 7 = very): “After reading the
passage, how much are you thinking about being a male or a female?”; “After reading the passage, to
what extent are you evaluating yourself, positively or negatively, in terms of your gender?” Two
questions measured student identity salience also on seven-point scales (1 = not at all; 7 = very):
“After reading the passage, to what extent are you assessing (i.e., evaluating, appreciating) yourself
as a UCSB student?”; “After reading the passage, how much is being a UCSB student foremost in
your thoughts?” A third forced-choice question was used to measure GIS and student identity
salience simultaneously, asking “After reading the passage, which aspect of yourself are you thinking
about the most?” The four choices, of which participants’ chose one as their response to the question,
were: “I’m thinking most about my gender (that I’m a male or female);” “I’m thinking most about
my being a UCSB student;” “I’m thinking both about my gender and being a UCSB student;” and
“I’m thinking about some other part of myself but not about my gender or being a UCSB student.”
This forced choice question was linearly transformed into two dichotomous “seven-point” scale
variables—one for student identity salience and the other for GIS—marking the occurrence or lack
thereof of high GIS and of high student identity salience, respectively.
3
Five filler questions, used to submerge the gender and student identity focus of the
investigation (and not used in the analyses), asked the extent to which participants were thinking
about being a member of various other groups (on seven-point scales; 1 = not at all; 7 = very): “being
a resident of the County of Santa Barbara;” “ethnicity;” “being a Californian;” “being your parents’
son or daughter;” “age.” These questions were interspersed with the other questions to make the
purpose of the investigation less apparent to participants.
The three specific GIS measures, when combined and placed on a seven-point scale, formed
a very reliable measure of reported GIS, M = 3.98, SD = 2.07,
= .94. The three student identity
salience measures, when combined and placed on a seven-point scale, also formed a very reliable


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