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Gender schematicity, gender identity salience, and gender-linked language use
Unformatted Document Text:  Gender schematicity, identity salience, and -linked language use 23 with similar levels of GIS. In other words, the language use of men and women is most different and distinguishable when men and women are GS and have a similar type and level of GIS. Summary of results. Taking the results as a whole, the following pattern emerges: As expected, GS men and GS women whose gender identity is salient adhere to using normative gender-linked language and avoid using non-normative gender-linked language (i.e., language typical of the opposite gender group). When gender identity is not salient (i.e., student identity is salient), GS men and GS women use non-normative gender-linked language and avoid using normative gender-linked language. When gender is not pertinent to current thinking of the self, language use is not influenced by gender resulting in the emergence of a Linguistic Liberation Pattern (LLP). Unexpectedly, GS men do not reflect this pattern to the same degree as women, although men do demonstrate the predicted pattern (but not significantly). NGS individuals are not influence (for the most part) by GIS regarding gender-linked language use. Language use differences between men and women are at their greatest when men and women are GS and under conditions of the same GIS. Discussion Over a variety of contexts men and women differ in their language use in consistent ways (Mulac, 1998; Mulac et al., 2001a). The current findings bring about several questions regarding the validity of the preceding statement, as the male/female language differences detected were consistent and inconsistent with past research. These consistencies and inconsistencies point to different theoretical issues addressed in the following discussion. Gender-Linked Language Differences While language differences were detected in the current study, these differences did not surface as a sex main effect across male and female communicators, as demonstrated in previous research (Mulac, 1998). Language differences were detected only in terms of the three-way interaction (sex by gender schematicity by GIS) and the two-way interaction (sex by GIS). In other words, all men and all women do not use language differently regardless of how one views the self

Authors: Palomares, Nicholas.
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Gender schematicity, identity salience, and -linked language use
23
with similar levels of GIS. In other words, the language use of men and women is most different and
distinguishable when men and women are GS and have a similar type and level of GIS.
Summary of results. Taking the results as a whole, the following pattern emerges: As
expected, GS men and GS women whose gender identity is salient adhere to using normative
gender-linked language and avoid using non-normative gender-linked language (i.e., language typical
of the opposite gender group). When gender identity is not salient (i.e., student identity is salient), GS
men and GS women use non-normative gender-linked language and avoid using normative
gender-linked language. When gender is not pertinent to current thinking of the self, language use is
not influenced by gender resulting in the emergence of a Linguistic Liberation Pattern (LLP).
Unexpectedly, GS men do not reflect this pattern to the same degree as women, although men do
demonstrate the predicted pattern (but not significantly). NGS individuals are not influence (for the
most part) by GIS regarding gender-linked language use. Language use differences between men and
women are at their greatest when men and women are GS and under conditions of the same GIS.
Discussion
Over a variety of contexts men and women differ in their language use in consistent ways
(Mulac, 1998; Mulac et al., 2001a). The current findings bring about several questions regarding the
validity of the preceding statement, as the male/female language differences detected were consistent
and inconsistent with past research. These consistencies and inconsistencies point to different
theoretical issues addressed in the following discussion.
Gender-Linked Language Differences
While language differences were detected in the current study, these differences did not
surface as a sex main effect across male and female communicators, as demonstrated in previous
research (Mulac, 1998). Language differences were detected only in terms of the three-way
interaction (sex by gender schematicity by GIS) and the two-way interaction (sex by GIS). In other
words, all men and all women do not use language differently regardless of how one views the self


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