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Gender schematicity, gender identity salience, and gender-linked language use
Unformatted Document Text:  Gender schematicity, identity salience, and -linked language use 27 dominance hypothesis could in effect be examining interactions of men and women under conditions of high GIS, where status differences in favor of men normatively fit the situation. To offer empirical support for this line of reasoning, GIS should be examined without confounding other variables, such as status. In other words, GIS salience should be manipulated independently from manipulating status differentials. Examining the influence of different types/natures of GIS on gender-linked language use and other communicative behaviors could prove meaningful. Contextual Factors The gender-linked language differences revealed in this research were not as extensive as reported elsewhere (Mulac, 1998). Only three language variables were consistently part of the current gender-linked language patterns, whereas in other research differences in many more language variables were detected. One reason for this inconsistency could be due to a change (i.e., decrease) in gender-linked language differences. However, as recent research has found extensive gender-linked language differences (e.g., Mulac et al., 2001b; Thomson & Murachver, 2001), this is not a likely reason. Further, the communicative task (i.e., speculating about what society will be like in 10 years) and the monologue nature of participants’ discourse also should not be reasons, as both are reminiscent of previous research showing extensive gender-linked language differences. A more probable explanation could be found in the nature of the communication medium used—e-mail. Admittedly, there are problems with the ecological validity of the current study’s use of e-mail as a form of computer-mediated communication (CMC). The limitations of the experiment required a very scripted e-mail task with an unspecified response partner. Perhaps the anonymous nature (i.e., participants did not know to whom they were sending their e-mail reply) of the communication influenced the number of gender-linked language variables detected. Thus, expanding the current research to other CMC environments (e.g., group chats, dyadic e-mail exchanges) with an assortment of varied contextual factors (e.g., visual anonymity, identifiability) could lead to fruitful work. Language use plays an important role for men and women in CMC—an environment (at

Authors: Palomares, Nicholas.
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Gender schematicity, identity salience, and -linked language use
27
dominance hypothesis could in effect be examining interactions of men and women under conditions
of high GIS, where status differences in favor of men normatively fit the situation. To offer empirical
support for this line of reasoning, GIS should be examined without confounding other variables, such
as status. In other words, GIS salience should be manipulated independently from manipulating
status differentials. Examining the influence of different types/natures of GIS on gender-linked
language use and other communicative behaviors could prove meaningful.
Contextual Factors
The gender-linked language differences revealed in this research were not as extensive as
reported elsewhere (Mulac, 1998). Only three language variables were consistently part of the current
gender-linked language patterns, whereas in other research differences in many more language
variables were detected. One reason for this inconsistency could be due to a change (i.e., decrease) in
gender-linked language differences. However, as recent research has found extensive gender-linked
language differences (e.g., Mulac et al., 2001b; Thomson & Murachver, 2001), this is not a likely
reason. Further, the communicative task (i.e., speculating about what society will be like in 10 years)
and the monologue nature of participants’ discourse also should not be reasons, as both are
reminiscent of previous research showing extensive gender-linked language differences. A more
probable explanation could be found in the nature of the communication medium used—e-mail.
Admittedly, there are problems with the ecological validity of the current study’s use of e-mail as a
form of computer-mediated communication (CMC). The limitations of the experiment required a
very scripted e-mail task with an unspecified response partner. Perhaps the anonymous nature (i.e.,
participants did not know to whom they were sending their e-mail reply) of the communication
influenced the number of gender-linked language variables detected. Thus, expanding the current
research to other CMC environments (e.g., group chats, dyadic e-mail exchanges) with an assortment
of varied contextual factors (e.g., visual anonymity, identifiability) could lead to fruitful work.
Language use plays an important role for men and women in CMC—an environment (at


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