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Gender schematicity, gender identity salience, and gender-linked language use
Unformatted Document Text:  Gender schematicity, identity salience, and -linked language use 2 identity theory (Tajfel, 1970; Tajfel & Turner, 1979), claims that individuals’ social behavior is based on a continuum ranging from inter-individual to intergroup. When one interacts with another in terms of various social groups, one is near the intergroup side of the continuum. SCT holds central the need for individuals to categorize themselves relative to the situational context to make sense of the world. The cognitively represented self changes depending on the current situation and which self-identity is activated situationally. Self-identities are based on the categories used to organize the self and are situated in a hierarchical system of classification. People use social similarities and differences between individuals to define the self and others as a member of a certain social group and not another (e.g., female, American, etc.). Depending on the social context or situation, a specific self-categorization (e.g., female/male) can be more salient at a certain time compared to another identity (e.g., student). According to SCT, accessibility and fit determine what group identity is likely to be salient in any given context (Oakes, 1987). Accessibility is defined as perceiver readiness to identify a stimulus in terms of a category (Bruner, 1957). The more situationally accessible a category is, the more likely an individual is to classify the self in terms of that category. Fit is the extent to which reality actually corresponds with the criteria which define the category (Turner, 1987). Fit is composed of two forms. Comparative fit is the extent to which intra-group differences are perceptually minimized and inter-group differences are perceptually maximized (Oakes, 1987). Comparative fit is determined by the ratio of the perceived differences between groups to the perceived similarities within groups (i.e., meta-contrast ratio; Turner, 1985). Normative fit is the extent to which perceived intra-group similarities and inter-group differences are socially meaningful and correspond to group norms. Normative fit varies depending on the specific context; certain inter-group differences will normatively fit the context at times and other inter-group differences will normatively fit at other times. An individual’s perception of the ingroup and outgroup must be different to a certain extent (i.e., comparative fit) in a complementary way that is in line with certain (but not necessarily all)

Authors: Palomares, Nicholas.
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Gender schematicity, identity salience, and -linked language use
2
identity theory (Tajfel, 1970; Tajfel & Turner, 1979), claims that individuals’ social behavior is
based on a continuum ranging from inter-individual to intergroup. When one interacts with another in
terms of various social groups, one is near the intergroup side of the continuum. SCT holds central
the need for individuals to categorize themselves relative to the situational context to make sense of
the world. The cognitively represented self changes depending on the current situation and which
self-identity is activated situationally. Self-identities are based on the categories used to organize the
self and are situated in a hierarchical system of classification. People use social similarities and
differences between individuals to define the self and others as a member of a certain social group
and not another (e.g., female, American, etc.). Depending on the social context or situation, a specific
self-categorization (e.g., female/male) can be more salient at a certain time compared to another
identity (e.g., student).
According to SCT, accessibility and fit determine what group identity is likely to be salient in
any given context (Oakes, 1987). Accessibility is defined as perceiver readiness to identify a stimulus
in terms of a category (Bruner, 1957). The more situationally accessible a category is, the more likely
an individual is to classify the self in terms of that category. Fit is the extent to which reality actually
corresponds with the criteria which define the category (Turner, 1987). Fit is composed of two forms.
Comparative fit is the extent to which intra-group differences are perceptually minimized and
inter-group differences are perceptually maximized (Oakes, 1987). Comparative fit is determined by
the ratio of the perceived differences between groups to the perceived similarities within groups (i.e.,
meta-contrast ratio; Turner, 1985). Normative fit is the extent to which perceived intra-group
similarities and inter-group differences are socially meaningful and correspond to group norms.
Normative fit varies depending on the specific context; certain inter-group differences will
normatively fit the context at times and other inter-group differences will normatively fit at other
times. An individual’s perception of the ingroup and outgroup must be different to a certain extent
(i.e., comparative fit) in a complementary way that is in line with certain (but not necessarily all)


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