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Gender schematicity, gender identity salience, and gender-linked language use
Unformatted Document Text:  Gender schematicity, identity salience, and -linked language use 5 status and more aesthetically pleasing than men’s language. The gender-linked language effect, then, is not an artifact of perceived speaker sex but rather determined in large part by the specific language features, which consistently are used differentially by men and women. Thus, prototypical male language is considered to be more dynamic than prototypical female language, whereas prototypical female language is considered to be more aesthetically pleasing and socio-intellectual than prototypical male language. Because particular language use has different impacts on the formation of impressions of male and female speakers (i.e., the gender-linked language effect), research should investigate the factors that affect the extent to which men and women use certain language features over others. Stated differently, much can be gained from a theoretical account of consequential male/female language differences, as current explanations are partial and ostensibly conflictual. Theoretical Rationale Gender-linked language use. Drawing on the consistent support that men and women use meaningfully different language in a variety of contexts, the following hypothesis is proposed: H 1 : Men and women differ in their prototypical gender-linked language use. Chronic gender identity accessibility and gender schema theory. Adherence to group norms, according to SCT, is affected by the chronic accessibility of the social category (Blanz, 1999; Spears, 2001). One understanding of chronic gender identity accessibility is available in gender schema theory (Bem, 1981b, 1983, 1985). Certain individuals possess gender schemas, which are cognitive structures or networks of associations that predispose individuals to process information in terms of the cultural definitions of gender. Gender schematic (GS; or sex-typed) individuals view themselves as prototypical to their gender and adopt consistent behaviors. GS individuals prefer to use gender-appropriate behaviors and, therefore, actively avoid using gender-inappropriate behavior more so than non-gender schematic (NGS) individuals (Bem & Lenney, 1976). In self-categorization terms, individuals with greater chronic gender identity accessibility (i.e., gender schematics) will use

Authors: Palomares, Nicholas.
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background image
Gender schematicity, identity salience, and -linked language use
5
status and more aesthetically pleasing than men’s language. The gender-linked language effect, then,
is not an artifact of perceived speaker sex but rather determined in large part by the specific language
features, which consistently are used differentially by men and women. Thus, prototypical male
language is considered to be more dynamic than prototypical female language, whereas prototypical
female language is considered to be more aesthetically pleasing and socio-intellectual than
prototypical male language.
Because particular language use has different impacts on the formation of impressions of
male and female speakers (i.e., the gender-linked language effect), research should investigate the
factors that affect the extent to which men and women use certain language features over others.
Stated differently, much can be gained from a theoretical account of consequential male/female
language differences, as current explanations are partial and ostensibly conflictual.
Theoretical Rationale
Gender-linked language use. Drawing on the consistent support that men and women use
meaningfully different language in a variety of contexts, the following hypothesis is proposed:
H
1
:
Men and women differ in their prototypical gender-linked language use.
Chronic gender identity accessibility and gender schema theory. Adherence to group norms,
according to SCT, is affected by the chronic accessibility of the social category (Blanz, 1999; Spears,
2001). One understanding of chronic gender identity accessibility is available in gender schema
theory (Bem, 1981b, 1983, 1985). Certain individuals possess gender schemas, which are cognitive
structures or networks of associations that predispose individuals to process information in terms of
the cultural definitions of gender. Gender schematic (GS; or sex-typed) individuals view themselves
as prototypical to their gender and adopt consistent behaviors. GS individuals prefer to use
gender-appropriate behaviors and, therefore, actively avoid using gender-inappropriate behavior
more so than non-gender schematic (NGS) individuals (Bem & Lenney, 1976). In self-categorization
terms, individuals with greater chronic gender identity accessibility (i.e., gender schematics) will use


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