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Assessing Media Exemplars and Shifting Journalistic Paradigms: A Survey Study of China’s Journalists
Unformatted Document Text:  15 into China and get meshed into indigenous processes in people’s everyday life (see Appadurai, 1996; Berger, 2002). The multiple channels may range from education in school, contacts with foreign colleagues, exposure to entertainment media (e.g., movies, books, magazines), and simply, increasing receptiveness to western ideas among those who grew up in the reform era. Some have labeled the composite of all these channels and the resulting atmosphere of emulating the “advanced” West as a “deterritorialized cosmopolitanism” (Tomlinson, 1996). Such a process may result in cohort differences. That is, younger cohorts are more likely to develop such a cultural disposition and may generalize it from their everyday life to their work. Traces of such cultural disposition among China’s urban youths has been a theme in the research of a number of scholars, especially those who conduct their research in areas of popular culture and consumption patterns (e.g., Davis, 1999; Link, Madsen, & Pickowica, 2002). There is every reason to expect that these young people, upon entering journalism, will bring such a disposition to their work and will view western media in a more positive light. Field observations have yielded many telling moments on the changing modes of thinking and operating among younger journalists under 30 years of age, as reflected in their attire, styles of working, kinds of connections, and images/symbols used in their talks (e.g., Pan, 2000b). The difficulty is that such broad-scoped but diffused changes in the overall context of China’s journalists and their work are very difficult to document with quantitative data. Nevertheless, all these observations and analyses suggest that China’s journalists may adopt the paradigm of western professional journalism via multiple routes. The key possible routes are:

Authors: Pan, Zhongdang. and Chan, Joseph Man.
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into China and get meshed into indigenous processes in people’s everyday life (see
Appadurai, 1996; Berger, 2002). The multiple channels may range from education in
school, contacts with foreign colleagues, exposure to entertainment media (e.g., movies,
books, magazines), and simply, increasing receptiveness to western ideas among those
who grew up in the reform era. Some have labeled the composite of all these channels
and the resulting atmosphere of emulating the “advanced” West as a “deterritorialized
cosmopolitanism” (Tomlinson, 1996). Such a process may result in cohort differences.
That is, younger cohorts are more likely to develop such a cultural disposition and may
generalize it from their everyday life to their work. Traces of such cultural disposition
among China’s urban youths has been a theme in the research of a number of scholars,
especially those who conduct their research in areas of popular culture and consumption
patterns (e.g., Davis, 1999; Link, Madsen, & Pickowica, 2002). There is every reason to
expect that these young people, upon entering journalism, will bring such a disposition to
their work and will view western media in a more positive light. Field observations have
yielded many telling moments on the changing modes of thinking and operating among
younger journalists under 30 years of age, as reflected in their attire, styles of working,
kinds of connections, and images/symbols used in their talks (e.g., Pan, 2000b). The
difficulty is that such broad-scoped but diffused changes in the overall context of China’s
journalists and their work are very difficult to document with quantitative data.
Nevertheless, all these observations and analyses suggest that China’s journalists
may adopt the paradigm of western professional journalism via multiple routes. The key
possible routes are:


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