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Assessing Media Exemplars and Shifting Journalistic Paradigms: A Survey Study of China’s Journalists
Unformatted Document Text:  32 a more elitist self-perception, which, as Reese (2001) suggest, is inclined towards a more cosmopolitan news perspective being shared by journalists of elitist media across nations. Third, years of working under the Party-media system have consequences. This variable shows a significant negative relationship with positive appraisals of foreign elite media (beta=-.141, p<.05) and even more so of the Southern Weekend (beta=-.196, p<.05). But the number of years working under the Party-media system no longer gets translated into positive appraisals of Party organs (beta=.057, n.s.). It is, however, related to more positive appraisals of Xinmin Evening (beta=.185, p <.01). Clearly, some subtle changes in how journalists view Party media are taking place in tandem with the larger systemic changes in the media reforms. Together, such evidence suggests that resistance to paradigm shifts is from within the Party-media system and part of the resistance may take the form of adjustment within the existing paradigm (Pan, 2000b). This interpretation is further strengthened by two additional observations. One is that commitment to journalism is positively related to positive appraisals of Party organs and to a lesser extent (insignificant), Xinmin Evening. The other is the weak but positive relationship (beta=.078, p=.15) between being a regular journalist and positive appraisals of foreign elite media. It is possible that the willingness to endorse the competing paradigm is a function of dissatisfaction with the existing one and is more likely to take place among those who are not shouldering the responsibility to defend the existing one. Fourth, exposure to overseas media, part of the broader route of contacts with and exposure to exemplars of the alternative paradigm, as suggested by the globalization thesis in the literature on the rise of the universal professionalism (e.g., Reese, 2001; Perkin, 1996), may indeed be a venue of influences. There are indications that frequent

Authors: Pan, Zhongdang. and Chan, Joseph Man.
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32
a more elitist self-perception, which, as Reese (2001) suggest, is inclined towards a more
cosmopolitan news perspective being shared by journalists of elitist media across nations.
Third, years of working under the Party-media system have consequences. This
variable shows a significant negative relationship with positive appraisals of foreign elite
media (beta=-.141, p<.05) and even more so of the Southern Weekend (beta=-.196, p<.05).
But the number of years working under the Party-media system no longer gets translated
into positive appraisals of Party organs (beta=.057, n.s.). It is, however, related to more
positive appraisals of Xinmin Evening (beta=.185, p <.01). Clearly, some subtle changes
in how journalists view Party media are taking place in tandem with the larger systemic
changes in the media reforms. Together, such evidence suggests that resistance to
paradigm shifts is from within the Party-media system and part of the resistance may take
the form of adjustment within the existing paradigm (Pan, 2000b). This interpretation is
further strengthened by two additional observations. One is that commitment to
journalism is positively related to positive appraisals of Party organs and to a lesser
extent (insignificant), Xinmin Evening. The other is the weak but positive relationship
(beta=.078, p=.15) between being a regular journalist and positive appraisals of foreign
elite media. It is possible that the willingness to endorse the competing paradigm is a
function of dissatisfaction with the existing one and is more likely to take place among
those who are not shouldering the responsibility to defend the existing one.
Fourth, exposure to overseas media, part of the broader route of contacts with and
exposure to exemplars of the alternative paradigm, as suggested by the globalization
thesis in the literature on the rise of the universal professionalism (e.g., Reese, 2001;
Perkin, 1996), may indeed be a venue of influences. There are indications that frequent


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