All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Assessing Media Exemplars and Shifting Journalistic Paradigms: A Survey Study of China’s Journalists
Unformatted Document Text:  3 parameters in journalists’ evaluations of each other’s work and the performance of various media outlets. Research on journalistic paradigm and its operation has been based mostly on qualitative data. One approach is to examine how journalists handle specific challenges to some of the basic principles of the existing paradigm. Journalistic paradigm is said to be at work when journalists re-affirm the core values and principles of their profession by re-interpreting facts and marginalizing such threatening cases as “anomalies” (Bennett et al., 1985; Reese, 1989). Another approach is to examine how journalists employ different modes of interpretation to recast the historical moments, which brought into sharp focus on the limits of the basic professional principles, and to re-articulate these principles (Zelizer, 1993). The third approach is illustrated in the work on media in Hong Kong’s political transition where Chan and Lee (1991) demonstrate how changing journalistic paradigms is reflected in not only changing media content but also changing media structures and practices. However, if paradigm is a “cognitive map,” we will need evidence showing the constellation of journalists’ perceptions. That is, we may approach changing journalistic paradigms by examining the contents and structures of journalists’ “working theories” (McQuail, 1994). In particular, we need to identify journalists’ shared values concerning their work, beliefs of journalistic roles, and ethical principles on journalistic practices. A specific set of idea elements in these areas and their configuration has been viewed as the rubric of “journalist professionalism” (Johnstone, Slawski, & Bowman, 1972; Weaver & Wilhoit, 1996).

Authors: Pan, Zhongdang. and Chan, Joseph Man.
first   previous   Page 4 of 54   next   last



background image
3
parameters in journalists’ evaluations of each other’s work and the performance of
various media outlets.
Research on journalistic paradigm and its operation has been based mostly on
qualitative data. One approach is to examine how journalists handle specific challenges
to some of the basic principles of the existing paradigm. Journalistic paradigm is said to
be at work when journalists re-affirm the core values and principles of their profession by
re-interpreting facts and marginalizing such threatening cases as “anomalies” (Bennett et
al., 1985; Reese, 1989). Another approach is to examine how journalists employ
different modes of interpretation to recast the historical moments, which brought into
sharp focus on the limits of the basic professional principles, and to re-articulate these
principles (Zelizer, 1993). The third approach is illustrated in the work on media in Hong
Kong’s political transition where Chan and Lee (1991) demonstrate how changing
journalistic paradigms is reflected in not only changing media content but also changing
media structures and practices.
However, if paradigm is a “cognitive map,” we will need evidence showing the
constellation of journalists’ perceptions. That is, we may approach changing journalistic
paradigms by examining the contents and structures of journalists’ “working theories”
(McQuail, 1994). In particular, we need to identify journalists’ shared values concerning
their work, beliefs of journalistic roles, and ethical principles on journalistic practices. A
specific set of idea elements in these areas and their configuration has been viewed as the
rubric of “journalist professionalism” (Johnstone, Slawski, & Bowman, 1972; Weaver &
Wilhoit, 1996).


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 54   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.