Citation

Gender differences in family communication about organ donation

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Get this Document | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

The research on organ donation issues consistently notes that the need for organs is ever-increasing, but the numbers of donated organs do not keep pace with demand. The research also indicates a large number of people who report a willingness to donate their organs, but notes the crucial role of the family of a deceased individual in the actual donation process. Discussions with family members appear to be key to transforming the wishes of the individual into an actual organ donation. Gender differences have been noted in terms of both attitudes toward organ donation and responses to donation messages. The present study investigated gender differences in conversations with family members about organ donation, finding that males are less likely to have such conversations and, when such conversations do occur, are less likely to include within them topics of conversation that are associated with more positive responses from family members. Speculation is offered about the reasons for these gender differences and suggestions are made about communicative strategies to more effectively convince males to both donate their organs and to talk to family members about donation.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

donat (255), organ (225), famili (146), member (80), discuss (77), male (66), convers (63), donor (59), like (58), femal (56), indic (53), respons (51), respond (51), communic (48), would (45), m (44), 1 (41), differ (40), agre (40), 2 (36), transplant (35),

Author's Keywords:

gender, family communication, organ donation
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: International Communication Association
URL:
http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p112211_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Thompson, Teresa., Robinson, James. and Kenny, Wade. "Gender differences in family communication about organ donation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p112211_index.html>

APA Citation:

Thompson, T. , Robinson, J. D. and Kenny, W. , 2003-05-27 "Gender differences in family communication about organ donation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p112211_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The research on organ donation issues consistently notes that the need for organs is ever-increasing, but the numbers of donated organs do not keep pace with demand. The research also indicates a large number of people who report a willingness to donate their organs, but notes the crucial role of the family of a deceased individual in the actual donation process. Discussions with family members appear to be key to transforming the wishes of the individual into an actual organ donation. Gender differences have been noted in terms of both attitudes toward organ donation and responses to donation messages. The present study investigated gender differences in conversations with family members about organ donation, finding that males are less likely to have such conversations and, when such conversations do occur, are less likely to include within them topics of conversation that are associated with more positive responses from family members. Speculation is offered about the reasons for these gender differences and suggestions are made about communicative strategies to more effectively convince males to both donate their organs and to talk to family members about donation.

Get this Document:

Find this citation or document at one or all of these locations below. The links below may have the citation or the entire document for free or you may purchase access to the document. Clicking on these links will change the site you're on and empty your shopping cart.

Associated Document Available Access Fee All Academic Inc.

Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 48
Word count: 11796
Text sample:
Gender Differences in Family Communication about Organ Donation 1 Abstract The research on organ donation issues consistently notes that the need for organs is ever- increasing but the numbers of donated organs do not keep pace with demand. The research also indicates a large number of people who report a willingness to donate their organs but notes the crucial role of the family of a deceased individual in the actual donation process. Discussions with family members appear to be
to discuss death 14. Other ___________________ 15. No response 16. Combination of 4 and 5 or 6 The coding scheme for question 14. 1. No response 2. Family agreed with donating 3. Family agreed with not donating 4. Family respected wishes either way 5. Family doesn't agree with donating but will respect my wishes 6. Family doesn't agree with not donating but will respect my wishes 7. Family doesn't agree with donating 8. Family doesn't agree with not donating


Similar Titles:
The Influence of Family Communication Patterns on Willingness to Engage in Family Discussion about Organ Donation

Ethnic Differences in Intention to Enroll in a State Organ Donor Registry and Intention to Talk With Family About Organ Donation

“They’ll Take You Apart Like a Buffalo, Those Organ Thieving Vultures:” How Family Members Talk to Each Other About Organ Donation

Communicating Female and Minority Interests Online: A Study of Website Issue Discussion among Female, Latino and African American Members of Congress


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.