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Gender differences in family communication about organ donation
Unformatted Document Text:  20 that females were more likely than males to have conversations with family members; women generally indicated that their conversations with family members were more likely to include a mention of their desire to donate organs, discussion of the need for organs, and an explanation of why they would/wouldn’t like to donate their organs. Females were also more likely to report that the family member agreed to comply with their requests. Additionally, females expressed more positive attitudes toward organ donation for transplant purposes, as an act of compassion, as an unselfish act, as a natural way to prolong life, and as a benefit to humanity. Not surprisingly, females also scored more positively on the summed score of the items on the Morgan & Miller scale. The data, then, provide support for the hypothesized gender differences. These results of these t-tests can be seen in Table 1. Insert Table 1 about here A series of chi-squared tests was then conducted on the responses to the coded open-ended questions. The overall chi-squared value was significant (chi-squared=25.93, df= 15, p=.039, contingency coefficient=.17). The percentages which will be reported for the following analyses compare the males vs. females who indicated use of each of the strategies. In all cases, however, the comparative percentages within each sex (percent of males choosing that strategy vs. percent of females choosing that strategy) yield the same pattern of results. It is important to note this because the sample included more females than males. Females were more likely than males to use the following message strategies: just informing the family member of the donation decision (Males=38.7%, F=61.3%), discuss how donation and transplantation work (M=40%; F=60%), present moral or

Authors: Thompson, Teresa., Robinson, James. and Kenny, Wade.
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that females were more likely than males to have conversations with family members;
women generally indicated that their conversations with family members were more
likely to include a mention of their desire to donate organs, discussion of the need for
organs, and an explanation of why they would/wouldn’t like to donate their organs.
Females were also more likely to report that the family member agreed to comply with
their requests. Additionally, females expressed more positive attitudes toward organ
donation for transplant purposes, as an act of compassion, as an unselfish act, as a natural
way to prolong life, and as a benefit to humanity. Not surprisingly, females also scored
more positively on the summed score of the items on the Morgan & Miller scale. The
data, then, provide support for the hypothesized gender differences. These results of
these t-tests can be seen in Table 1.
Insert Table 1 about here
A series of chi-squared tests was then conducted on the responses to the coded
open-ended questions. The overall chi-squared value was significant (chi-squared=25.93,
df= 15, p=.039, contingency coefficient=.17). The percentages which will be reported for
the following analyses compare the males vs. females who indicated use of each of the
strategies. In all cases, however, the comparative percentages within each sex (percent of
males choosing that strategy vs. percent of females choosing that strategy) yield the same
pattern of results. It is important to note this because the sample included more females
than males.
Females were more likely than males to use the following message strategies:
just informing the family member of the donation decision (Males=38.7%, F=61.3%),
discuss how donation and transplantation work (M=40%; F=60%), present moral or


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