Citation

Audience Perceptions of Background Nonverbal Behaviors Displayed by Candidates in Televised Political Debates

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Get this Document | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

Compared to televised debates using a single-screen format, those using a split screen presenting both debaters simultaneously show viewers the nonverbal reactions of a debaterís opponent. This study examined how appropriate and respectful such nonverbal behaviors are perceived to be. Students watched one of four versions of a televised debate. One version used a single-screen format, showing only the speaker, while the other three versions used a split-screen format in which the speakerís opponent displayed constant, occasional, or no nonverbal disagreement with the speaker. Students then rated the debatersí respectfulness and appropriateness. Analysis indicated that the opponent was perceived to be less respectful and less appropriate when he displayed any background disagreement compared to when he did not. The speaker was perceived as most respectful and appropriate when his opponent displayed constant nonverbal disagreement. These results and their implications are discussed.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

debat (95), behavior (68), disagr (61), background (58), nonspeak (41), speaker (36), appropri (36), oppon (35), respect (34), display (32), communic (30), moder (25), candid (24), rate (24), nonverb (22), signific (21), perceiv (21), speak (21), studi (20), constant (20), indic (18),

Author's Keywords:

political debates, nonverbal behavior, split screen
Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: International Communication Association
URL:
http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p112220_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Seiter, John. "Audience Perceptions of Background Nonverbal Behaviors Displayed by Candidates in Televised Political Debates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p112220_index.html>

APA Citation:

Seiter, J. S. , 2003-05-27 "Audience Perceptions of Background Nonverbal Behaviors Displayed by Candidates in Televised Political Debates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p112220_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Compared to televised debates using a single-screen format, those using a split screen presenting both debaters simultaneously show viewers the nonverbal reactions of a debaterís opponent. This study examined how appropriate and respectful such nonverbal behaviors are perceived to be. Students watched one of four versions of a televised debate. One version used a single-screen format, showing only the speaker, while the other three versions used a split-screen format in which the speakerís opponent displayed constant, occasional, or no nonverbal disagreement with the speaker. Students then rated the debatersí respectfulness and appropriateness. Analysis indicated that the opponent was perceived to be less respectful and less appropriate when he displayed any background disagreement compared to when he did not. The speaker was perceived as most respectful and appropriate when his opponent displayed constant nonverbal disagreement. These results and their implications are discussed.

Get this Document:

Find this citation or document at one or all of these locations below. The links below may have the citation or the entire document for free or you may purchase access to the document. Clicking on these links will change the site you're on and empty your shopping cart.

Associated Document Available Access Fee All Academic Inc.

Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 16
Word count: 3669
Text sample:
Background Behaviors: 1 Running Head: Background Behaviors Audience Perceptions of Background Nonverbal Behaviors Displayed by Candidates in Televised Political Debates Author information has been excluded for review. The ICA tracking number for this manuscript is ICA-6-10018 Background Behaviors: 2 Abstract Compared to televised debates using a single-screen format those using a split screen presenting both debaters simultaneously show viewers the nonverbal reactions of a debater’s opponent. This study examined how appropriate and respectful such nonverbal behaviors are perceived to
5.0 (2.9)a 4.5 (2.3)a 9.7 (3.3)b 12.1 (2.5)c 75.08 Nonspeaking Debater’s Respectfulness 6.4 (1.7)a 5.4 (2.1)a 9.7 (3.0)b 12.0 (2.6)c 67.95 Speaking Debater’s Appropriateness 8.0 (3.1)a 7.8 (3.8)a 8.5 (3.6)a 6.1 (3.4)b 3.96 Speaking Debater’s Background Behaviors: 16 Respectfulness 8.7 (2.5)a 9.0 (2.8)a 9.1 (3.0)a 7.2 (3.1)b 4.02 ______________________________________________________________________________ Note: The higher the mean the lower the perceived appropriateness and respectfulness. Within each row means without a common subscript differ significantly.


Similar Titles:
The Role of Background Behavior in Televised Debates: Does Displaying Nonverbal Agreement and/or Disagreement Benefit Either Debater?

Impression Management in Televised Debates: The Effect of Background Nonverbal Behavior on Audience Perceptions of Debatersí Likeability

Presidential Debates, Candidate Preferences, and Voting Behavior: Linking Debate Content to Voters' Assessments


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.