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Authoritative Parenting and Drug-Prevention Practices: Implications for Anti-Drug Ads for Parents
Unformatted Document Text:  Drug Prevention Practices 10 The participants were randomly selected from a list of addresses and phone numbers provided by the school district’s administration office. A systematic random sampling procedure with a random start was used to select participants with adolescents in each of the three grades of interest. If the participants were not reached within four call backs, they were discarded from the sample. The response rate was 85%. Four individuals were trained by the authors. Calling occurred on three Sunday afternoons within a seven-week period. Callers asked to speak with one of the parents or guardians of a specified child randomly selected from the sampling frame. Callers identified their university and department affiliation. Callers told parents the purpose of the call was to conduct a study on parenting and adolescents. After receiving consent, parents completed the survey in 10 to 15 minutes. Since it was probable that the parent had more than one child, it was methodologically critical that the callers reminded parents at the beginning and routinely throughout the survey that their responses should concern only the identified child as parenting styles may differ among children. Measures Attitudes about drug prevention behaviors. Parents reported their attitudes about specific parenting behaviors typically associated with the prevention of adolescent substance use (Hornik et al., 2001). Parents indicated on a 1 (strongly disagree) to 7 (strongly agree) scale if they believed each of the following were “good” and “important:” (a) discussing family rules about drug use in the next six months; (b) having a discussion in the next six months about specific strategies your child could use to stay away from drugs; (c) having a discussion with your child in the next six months about the people your child or you know who have gotten into trouble with

Authors: Stephenson, Michael., Atkinson, Joshua., Tschida, David. and Quick, Brian.
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Drug Prevention Practices 10
The participants were randomly selected from a list of addresses and phone numbers
provided by the school district’s administration office. A systematic random sampling procedure
with a random start was used to select participants with adolescents in each of the three grades of
interest. If the participants were not reached within four call backs, they were discarded from the
sample. The response rate was 85%.
Four individuals were trained by the authors. Calling occurred on three Sunday
afternoons within a seven-week period. Callers asked to speak with one of the parents or
guardians of a specified child randomly selected from the sampling frame. Callers identified
their university and department affiliation. Callers told parents the purpose of the call was to
conduct a study on parenting and adolescents. After receiving consent, parents completed the
survey in 10 to 15 minutes. Since it was probable that the parent had more than one child, it was
methodologically critical that the callers reminded parents at the beginning and routinely
throughout the survey that their responses should concern only the identified child as parenting
styles may differ among children.
Measures
Attitudes about drug prevention behaviors. Parents reported their attitudes about specific
parenting behaviors typically associated with the prevention of adolescent substance use (Hornik
et al., 2001). Parents indicated on a 1 (strongly disagree) to 7 (strongly agree) scale if they
believed each of the following were “good” and “important:” (a) discussing family rules about
drug use in the next six months; (b) having a discussion in the next six months about specific
strategies your child could use to stay away from drugs; (c) having a discussion with your child in
the next six months about the people your child or you know who have gotten into trouble with


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