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Authoritative Parenting and Drug-Prevention Practices: Implications for Anti-Drug Ads for Parents
Unformatted Document Text:  Drug Prevention Practices 15 Hypothesis 1 Of the seven t-tests, three were statistically significant at the adjusted alpha (p = .007). Specifically, high authoritarian parents (M = 6.15, SD = 1.45) reported stronger intentions than low authoritarian parents (M = 5.38, SD = 1.68) to discuss family rules, t (156) = 3.11, p < .007. Additionally, high authoritarian parents (M = 5.99, SD = 1.46) reported stronger intentions than low authoritarian parents (M = 5.18, SD = 1.64) to discuss strategies to avoid drugs, t (156) = 3.30, p < .007. Finally, high authoritarian parents (M = 6.71, SD = .76) reported stronger intentions than low authoritarian parents (M = 6.33, SD = 1.06) to closely monitor their child’s daily activities, t (156) = 2.53, p < .007. Two other tests were statistically significant, but not at the Bonferroni-adjusted p value. High authoritarian parents reported stronger intention than low authoritarian to discuss those in trouble with drugs (p = .022) and to personally know their child’s friends (p = .035). This hypothesis received partial support. Research Questions 1 and 2 and Hypothesis 2 The remaining three inquiries were assessed jointly in a series of multiple regression tests. We begin by reporting the results of the regression analysis for each of the three criterion variables (intention to monitor, intention to talk about drugs, intention to be aware of the child’s environment). We conclude this section by briefly indicating the results to the remaining hypothesis and research questions. See Table 2. Intention to monitor. In block one, attitudes ( = .48) and subjective norms ( = .21) were significant predictors of parents’ behavioral intentions to monitor their children although authoritative parenting ( = .07) was not, F (3, 154) = 26.72, p < .001, R 2 = .34. In block two, the interaction between subjective norm and authoritative parenting was not significant.

Authors: Stephenson, Michael., Atkinson, Joshua., Tschida, David. and Quick, Brian.
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Drug Prevention Practices 15

Hypothesis 1
Of the seven t-tests, three were statistically significant at the adjusted alpha (p = .007).
Specifically, high authoritarian parents (M = 6.15, SD = 1.45) reported stronger intentions than
low authoritarian parents (M = 5.38, SD = 1.68) to discuss family rules, t (156) = 3.11, p < .007.
Additionally, high authoritarian parents (M = 5.99, SD = 1.46) reported stronger intentions than
low authoritarian parents (M = 5.18, SD = 1.64) to discuss strategies to avoid drugs, t (156) =
3.30, p < .007. Finally, high authoritarian parents (M = 6.71, SD = .76) reported stronger
intentions than low authoritarian parents (M = 6.33, SD = 1.06) to closely monitor their child’s
daily activities, t (156) = 2.53, p < .007. Two other tests were statistically significant, but not at
the Bonferroni-adjusted p value. High authoritarian parents reported stronger intention than low
authoritarian to discuss those in trouble with drugs (p = .022) and to personally know their
child’s friends (p = .035). This hypothesis received partial support.
Research Questions 1 and 2 and Hypothesis 2
The remaining three inquiries were assessed jointly in a series of multiple regression
tests. We begin by reporting the results of the regression analysis for each of the three criterion
variables (intention to monitor, intention to talk about drugs, intention to be aware of the child’s
environment). We conclude this section by briefly indicating the results to the remaining
hypothesis and research questions. See Table 2.
Intention to monitor. In block one, attitudes ( = .48) and subjective norms ( = .21)
were significant predictors of parents’ behavioral intentions to monitor their children although
authoritative parenting ( = .07) was not, F (3, 154) = 26.72, p < .001, R
2
= .34. In block two,
the interaction between subjective norm and authoritative parenting was not significant.


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