All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Authoritative Parenting and Drug-Prevention Practices: Implications for Anti-Drug Ads for Parents
Unformatted Document Text:  Drug Prevention Practices 20 conversations. If such discussions are perceived as difficult by parents, and if these discussions are indeed more fleeting and occur in passing moments, then it should be no surprise that subjective norms and not attitudes are the stronger influence on behavioral intentions to engage in talk about drugs with children. It appears, however, that parents may be making a more concerted effort to engage in parent-child communication about drugs. The Partnership for a Drug-Free America (2000) reported that more than half (57%) of the 800 parents in the attitude tracking study claimed to speak with their child about drugs at least four times in 1999, a sizable increase from 44% in 1998. Additionally, Hornik and colleagues (2001) reported that 77% of parents reported talking to their 9- to 18-year old about drugs at least twice over the previous year. As might be expected, parents reported higher estimates than their children by about 20-percentage points regarding the amount of parent-child communication that had occurred. Such reports are generally more consistent with Miller (in press) who found that 43% of the 67 adolescents (average age was 13) she interviewed recalled any communication with their parents about alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs with their parents. Our data in this study cannot address the inconsistencies regarding the number of parents talking with their children about drugs. However, our data do suggest that parent-child discussions are more likely the result of an expectation from important others for these discussions to occur. Additionally, intentions to have parent-child discussions are not limited to only high authoritative parents. Regardless of how they happen, it is clear that parent-child communication buffers the psychosocial risk factors associated with adolescent substance use, such as delinquency, unconventionality, impulsivity, or rebelliousness (Newcomb & Earleywine,

Authors: Stephenson, Michael., Atkinson, Joshua., Tschida, David. and Quick, Brian.
first   previous   Page 20 of 36   next   last



background image
Drug Prevention Practices 20

conversations. If such discussions are perceived as difficult by parents, and if these discussions
are indeed more fleeting and occur in passing moments, then it should be no surprise that
subjective norms and not attitudes are the stronger influence on behavioral intentions to engage
in talk about drugs with children.
It appears, however, that parents may be making a more concerted effort to engage in
parent-child communication about drugs. The Partnership for a Drug-Free America (2000)
reported that more than half (57%) of the 800 parents in the attitude tracking study claimed to
speak with their child about drugs at least four times in 1999, a sizable increase from 44% in
1998. Additionally, Hornik and colleagues (2001) reported that 77% of parents reported talking
to their 9- to 18-year old about drugs at least twice over the previous year. As might be expected,
parents reported higher estimates than their children by about 20-percentage points regarding the
amount of parent-child communication that had occurred. Such reports are generally more
consistent with Miller (in press) who found that 43% of the 67 adolescents (average age was 13)
she interviewed recalled any communication with their parents about alcohol, tobacco, or other
drugs with their parents.
Our data in this study cannot address the inconsistencies regarding the number of parents
talking with their children about drugs. However, our data do suggest that parent-child
discussions are more likely the result of an expectation from important others for these
discussions to occur. Additionally, intentions to have parent-child discussions are not limited to
only high authoritative parents. Regardless of how they happen, it is clear that parent-child
communication buffers the psychosocial risk factors associated with adolescent substance use,
such as delinquency, unconventionality, impulsivity, or rebelliousness (Newcomb & Earleywine,


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 20 of 36   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.