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Authoritative Parenting and Drug-Prevention Practices: Implications for Anti-Drug Ads for Parents
Unformatted Document Text:  Drug Prevention Practices 23 researchers to know if behavioral intentions predicted self-reported behaviors in a follow-up survey. Additionally, it was difficult to assess some TRA components as specified by Ajzen and Fishbein (1980) with phone survey methodology. That is, the expectancy-value nature of this theory implies a much more detailed measurement scheme. In particular, subjective norm would ideally be measured and specified as a product of the normative behavior and one’s motivation to comply with relevant important others. In our study, we would have measured seven normative behaviors times three or more motivation to comply items, depending upon the number of significant others (i.e., spouse, in-laws, other parents). This approach, in phone survey methodology, would have been very repetitive and increased the likelihood that respondents would grow tired (or annoyed) before the survey could be completed. Given the possible threats to the validity of the data, we opted for a different measurement scheme. O’Keefe (2002) reviews the conceptual and methodological limitations of the subjective norm component. However, our measures did not deviate substantially from the nature of the construct. Conclusion Low authoritative parents are less likely than high authoritative parents to engage in important drug-prevention behaviors. Moreover, for low authoritative parents, the attitude- behavioral intention relationship is significantly weaker for parental monitoring and being aware of their child’s environment. Low authoritative parents who perceive little expectation from important others are also less likely to monitor their child’s environment. Therefore, low authoritative parents represent a potential target audience for anti-drug messages. Formative research would be invaluable in determining the viability of this target group for subsequent drug prevention ads.

Authors: Stephenson, Michael., Atkinson, Joshua., Tschida, David. and Quick, Brian.
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Drug Prevention Practices 23

researchers to know if behavioral intentions predicted self-reported behaviors in a follow-up
survey. Additionally, it was difficult to assess some TRA components as specified by Ajzen and
Fishbein (1980) with phone survey methodology. That is, the expectancy-value nature of this
theory implies a much more detailed measurement scheme. In particular, subjective norm would
ideally be measured and specified as a product of the normative behavior and one’s motivation to
comply with relevant important others. In our study, we would have measured seven normative
behaviors times three or more motivation to comply items, depending upon the number of
significant others (i.e., spouse, in-laws, other parents). This approach, in phone survey
methodology, would have been very repetitive and increased the likelihood that respondents
would grow tired (or annoyed) before the survey could be completed. Given the possible threats
to the validity of the data, we opted for a different measurement scheme. O’Keefe (2002)
reviews the conceptual and methodological limitations of the subjective norm component.
However, our measures did not deviate substantially from the nature of the construct.
Conclusion
Low authoritative parents are less likely than high authoritative parents to engage in
important drug-prevention behaviors. Moreover, for low authoritative parents, the attitude-
behavioral intention relationship is significantly weaker for parental monitoring and being aware
of their child’s environment. Low authoritative parents who perceive little expectation from
important others are also less likely to monitor their child’s environment. Therefore, low
authoritative parents represent a potential target audience for anti-drug messages. Formative
research would be invaluable in determining the viability of this target group for subsequent drug
prevention ads.


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