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Authoritative Parenting and Drug-Prevention Practices: Implications for Anti-Drug Ads for Parents
Unformatted Document Text:  Drug Prevention Practices 6 and-take (Dornbusch et al., 1987). In sum, authoritative parents appear to exhibit many of the skills necessary to help their children avert illicit drug use. H1: High-authoritative parents are more likely than low-authoritative parents to engage in practices that prevent adolescent substance use. Theory of Reasoned Action We now turn to the theory of reasoned action (TRA) to examine the role of authoritative parenting in adaptive drug-prevention practices and communication (Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980). The primary criterion variable in the TRA is one’s intention to engage in a particular behavior. This premise is supported by meta-analytic research which demonstrates a robust relationship between intentions and behaviors (Kim & Hunter, 1993a; Sheppard, Hartwick, & Warshaw, 1988). The TRA has been examined and tested in health and non-health contexts, including energy conservation (Seligman, Hall, & Finegan, 1983), mentoring (Kim et al., 2001), extraterrestrial beliefs (Patry & Pelletier, 2001), smoking (McGahee, Kemp, & Tingen, 2000), and exercise (Yordy & Lent, 1993). The TRA maintains that one’s intention is a function of two independent antecedent factors: an individual’s attitude toward the behavior and one’s subjective norm. The first factor, the attitude, represents a negative or positive evaluation of the beliefs one holds about a specific behavior (Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980). In essence, the attitude is determined by the individual’s own thoughts and feelings of what can or cannot be gained by performing a specific behavior (i.e., monitoring a child’s behavior or talking to a child about drugs). The second antecedent to intention is the subjective norm. A subjective norm represents one’s beliefs of how significant others feel about the behavior in question as well as one’s motivation to comply with these

Authors: Stephenson, Michael., Atkinson, Joshua., Tschida, David. and Quick, Brian.
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Drug Prevention Practices 6

and-take (Dornbusch et al., 1987). In sum, authoritative parents appear to exhibit many of the
skills necessary to help their children avert illicit drug use.
H1: High-authoritative parents are more likely than low-authoritative parents to engage in
practices that prevent adolescent substance use.
Theory of Reasoned Action
We now turn to the theory of reasoned action (TRA) to examine the role of authoritative
parenting in adaptive drug-prevention practices and communication (Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980).
The primary criterion variable in the TRA is one’s intention to engage in a particular behavior.
This premise is supported by meta-analytic research which demonstrates a robust relationship
between intentions and behaviors (Kim & Hunter, 1993a; Sheppard, Hartwick, & Warshaw,
1988). The TRA has been examined and tested in health and non-health contexts, including
energy conservation (Seligman, Hall, & Finegan, 1983), mentoring (Kim et al., 2001),
extraterrestrial beliefs (Patry & Pelletier, 2001), smoking (McGahee, Kemp, & Tingen, 2000),
and exercise (Yordy & Lent, 1993).
The TRA maintains that one’s intention is a function of two independent antecedent
factors: an individual’s attitude toward the behavior and one’s subjective norm. The first factor,
the attitude, represents a negative or positive evaluation of the beliefs one holds about a specific
behavior (Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980). In essence, the attitude is determined by the individual’s
own thoughts and feelings of what can or cannot be gained by performing a specific behavior
(i.e., monitoring a child’s behavior or talking to a child about drugs). The second antecedent to
intention is the subjective norm. A subjective norm represents one’s beliefs of how significant
others feel about the behavior in question as well as one’s motivation to comply with these


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