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Authoritative Parenting and Drug-Prevention Practices: Implications for Anti-Drug Ads for Parents
Unformatted Document Text:  Drug Prevention Practices 8 2001; Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980; O’Keefe, 2002; Trafimow & Finlay, 1996). For example, multiple studies on exercise show attitude as the stronger predictor of behavioral intentions (Blue, 1995; Goden, 1994; Yordy & Lent, 1993). There is other research, however, that shows the ability of subjective norms to predict behavioral intentions. Ross and McLaws (1992) studied the beliefs and subjective norm influences of gay men in using condoms and found that subjective norm accounted for four times more of the variance than did attitudes. Hence, consideration must be given to the context and nature of the problem to which this theory is being applied. RQ1: Are attitudes or subjective norms stronger predictors of behavioral intent to engage in drug-prevention parenting practices? Authoritative Parenting and the Theory of Reasoned Action The literature shows that parenting practices exhibited by authoritative parents are most effective in preventing adolescent problem behaviors (e.g., Ary et al., 1999) and adolescent substance use (Baumrind, 1991). The thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of authoritative parents clearly put them at an advantage to raise well-adjusted children. The TRA provides a coherent theoretical framework with which to examine how authoritative parenting moderates (i.e., magnifies or mitigates) the influence of attitude and subjective norm on behavioral intentions. If authoritative parents engage in the behaviors to help adolescents avert illicit substance use, then it is reasonable to assume that their attitudes toward these drug-prevention behaviors are also likely to be positive. Parents who do not embrace the authoritative parenting style are less likely to engage in prevention behaviors, and therefore, also likely to have less positive attitudes about the drug-prevention behaviors. This reasoning suggests that authoritative parenting moderates

Authors: Stephenson, Michael., Atkinson, Joshua., Tschida, David. and Quick, Brian.
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Drug Prevention Practices 8

2001; Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980; O’Keefe, 2002; Trafimow & Finlay, 1996). For example,
multiple studies on exercise show attitude as the stronger predictor of behavioral intentions
(Blue, 1995; Goden, 1994; Yordy & Lent, 1993). There is other research, however, that shows
the ability of subjective norms to predict behavioral intentions. Ross and McLaws (1992)
studied the beliefs and subjective norm influences of gay men in using condoms and found that
subjective norm accounted for four times more of the variance than did attitudes. Hence,
consideration must be given to the context and nature of the problem to which this theory is
being applied.
RQ1: Are attitudes or subjective norms stronger predictors of behavioral intent to engage
in drug-prevention parenting practices?
Authoritative Parenting and the Theory of Reasoned Action
The literature shows that parenting practices exhibited by authoritative parents are most
effective in preventing adolescent problem behaviors (e.g., Ary et al., 1999) and adolescent
substance use (Baumrind, 1991). The thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of authoritative parents
clearly put them at an advantage to raise well-adjusted children. The TRA provides a coherent
theoretical framework with which to examine how authoritative parenting moderates (i.e.,
magnifies or mitigates) the influence of attitude and subjective norm on behavioral intentions. If
authoritative parents engage in the behaviors to help adolescents avert illicit substance use, then
it is reasonable to assume that their attitudes toward these drug-prevention behaviors are also
likely to be positive. Parents who do not embrace the authoritative parenting style are less likely
to engage in prevention behaviors, and therefore, also likely to have less positive attitudes about
the drug-prevention behaviors. This reasoning suggests that authoritative parenting moderates


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