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Exploring the Link Between the Concepts of Organization-Public Relationships and Organizational Reputations
Unformatted Document Text:  Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266 10 conducted a study of student-university relationship attitudes and satisfaction evaluations, and the results of the study suggested that relationship attitudes differentiate those who returned to the university from those who did not, providing the evidence of a relationally- based grounding for the practice of public relations. For this study, the researcher attempted to measure relationships between the case organization and research participants, using Hon and J. Grunig’s (1999) six dimensions of relationships, so the following research question is suggested: Research Question 1: How do participants evaluate their relationships with the case organization? As relationship management becomes a central topic of public relations research in recent years, among practitioners, reputation management is increasingly recognized as a fad of the public relations practice (“PR News,” 1999, November 15). In academia, business scholars or organizational psychologists have actively advocated the concept of reputation; a few public relations scholars (e.g., Hutton et al. 2001; Kim, 2000, 2001) attempted to demonstrate the link between public relations and organizational outcomes using the reputation concept as a mediating variable: Spending on public relations affects organizational reputations, which, in turn, affects financial performances of an organization. Measuring Organizational Reputations Practitioners have paid much attention to measures of reputations, as academics of public relations to measures of relationships. Holding the assumption that reputation is an intangible asset of an organization to enhance financial performances (Fombrun, 1996; Hall, 1992), public relations practitioners have sought for a compelling evidence of link between public relations and reputation. Then, to show the effects of public relations on reputation, the next critical step is to measure the concept of reputation corresponding to expenditures on public relations. This section will provide a brief background of reputation research, which includes definitions and measures of the concept. Capelin’s (1999) following comments suggest inconsistency of current reputation measures: “I applaud the ‘hot ticket’ status of reputation management that has engulfed PR Week’s pages … But while there is clearly a place for a consistent system to evaluate corporate status, it is not the Holy Grail of reputation management” (“PR Week,” 1999, November 15). Despite popular surveys to measure reputations (Deephouse, 2000, 2002; Fombrun, 1996; Hall, 1992), following the lead of Fortune magazine, several issues have been raised over the operational definitions of the reputation concept (Bromely, 1993, 2000;

Authors: Yang, SungUn. and Mallabo, Jose.
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Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266
10
conducted a study of student-university relationship attitudes and satisfaction evaluations,
and the results of the study suggested that relationship attitudes differentiate those who
returned to the university from those who did not, providing the evidence of a relationally-
based grounding for the practice of public relations.
For this study, the researcher attempted to measure relationships between the case
organization and research participants, using Hon and J. Grunig’s (1999) six dimensions of
relationships, so the following research question is suggested:
Research Question 1: How do participants evaluate their relationships with the case
organization?
As relationship management becomes a central topic of public relations research in recent
years, among practitioners, reputation management is increasingly recognized as a fad of the
public relations practice (“PR News,” 1999, November 15). In academia, business scholars or
organizational psychologists have actively advocated the concept of reputation; a few public
relations scholars (e.g., Hutton et al. 2001; Kim, 2000, 2001) attempted to demonstrate the
link between public relations and organizational outcomes using the reputation concept as a
mediating variable: Spending on public relations affects organizational reputations, which, in
turn, affects financial performances of an organization.
Measuring Organizational Reputations
Practitioners have paid much attention to measures of reputations, as academics of
public relations to measures of relationships. Holding the assumption that reputation is an
intangible asset of an organization to enhance financial performances (Fombrun, 1996; Hall,
1992), public relations practitioners have sought for a compelling evidence of link between
public relations and reputation. Then, to show the effects of public relations on reputation,
the next critical step is to measure the concept of reputation corresponding to expenditures on
public relations. This section will provide a brief background of reputation research, which
includes definitions and measures of the concept.
Capelin’s (1999) following comments suggest inconsistency of current reputation
measures: “I applaud the ‘hot ticket’ status of reputation management that has engulfed PR
Week’s pages … But while there is clearly a place for a consistent system to evaluate
corporate status, it is not the Holy Grail of reputation management” (“PR Week,” 1999,
November 15). Despite popular surveys to measure reputations (Deephouse, 2000, 2002;
Fombrun, 1996; Hall, 1992), following the lead of Fortune magazine, several issues have
been raised over the operational definitions of the reputation concept (Bromely, 1993, 2000;


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