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Exploring the Link Between the Concepts of Organization-Public Relationships and Organizational Reputations
Unformatted Document Text:  Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266 11 J. Grunig & Hung, 2002; Pruzan, 2001) as well as the measurement system, which is commonly referred as a “ranking system” (Bromley, 2000; Fombrun & Gardberg, 2000; J. Grunig & Hung, 2002; Hutton et al., 2001; Schultz, Mouritsen, & Gabrielsen, 2001). From publicity, public relations practitioners and scholars have adopted one “faddish” term after another to define the value of public relations, and now most popular terms appear to be reputation and brand (J. Grunig & Hung, 2002, p. 2). J. Grunig and Hung (2002) found the confusing use of these terms: They are used interchangeably in the literature of business; except identity, all of them basically refer to the same phenomenon, which is basically “cognitive representations that public have of organizations” (Grunig & Hung, 2002, pp. 1-2). Identity, according to them, describes what an organization thinks of itself (p. 2). Reputation scholars hold different perspectives on definitions of reputation and in distinguishing reputation from other terms. Some scholars (e.g., Bromley, 1993, 2000; Fombrun, 1996; Fombrun & Van Riel, 1997) maintained that reputation is a new concept of a strategic asset. In defining reputation, for example, Bromley (2000) also put differences of identity, image, and reputation: “Identity is defined as the way key members conceptualize their organization; image is defined as the way an organization presents itself to its publics, especially visually; and reputation is defined as the way key external stakeholder groups or other interested parties actually conceptualize that organization” (p. 241). On the website of the Reputation Institute (n.d.b.), the founder Fombrun asserted: “People often confuse the words reputation, brand, and image. They mean different things … A company has many different images and can have many brands. In contrast, a corporate reputation signals the overall attractiveness of the company to all of its constituents, including employees, customers, investors, reporters, and the general public.” Others (e.g., Caruana & Chircop, 2000; Pruzan, 2001), on the other hand, emphasized the association of the reputation concept to other terms. For example, Caruana and Chircop (2000) analyzed the background of reputation research and stressed the interconnectedness of terms: “Research on corporate reputation is rooted in earlier work on corporate image, corporate identity and personality … Corporate reputation emerges from the images held by various publics of an organization … Corporate reputation is closely related to brand equity” (p. 43). Pruzan (2001) put more emphases on image and identity in explaining the emergence of reputation: “There is no doubt that corporate reputation—in the sense of corporate

Authors: Yang, SungUn. and Mallabo, Jose.
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Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266
11
J. Grunig & Hung, 2002; Pruzan, 2001) as well as the measurement system, which is
commonly referred as a “ranking system” (Bromley, 2000; Fombrun & Gardberg, 2000; J.
Grunig & Hung, 2002; Hutton et al., 2001; Schultz, Mouritsen, & Gabrielsen, 2001).
From publicity, public relations practitioners and scholars have adopted one
“faddish” term after another to define the value of public relations, and now most popular
terms appear to be reputation and brand (J. Grunig & Hung, 2002, p. 2). J. Grunig and Hung
(2002) found the confusing use of these terms: They are used interchangeably in the literature
of business; except identity, all of them basically refer to the same phenomenon, which is
basically “cognitive representations that public have of organizations” (Grunig & Hung,
2002, pp. 1-2). Identity, according to them, describes what an organization thinks of itself (p.
2).
Reputation scholars hold different perspectives on definitions of reputation and in
distinguishing reputation from other terms. Some scholars (e.g., Bromley, 1993, 2000;
Fombrun, 1996; Fombrun & Van Riel, 1997) maintained that reputation is a new concept of a
strategic asset. In defining reputation, for example, Bromley (2000) also put differences of
identity, image, and reputation: “Identity is defined as the way key members conceptualize
their organization; image is defined as the way an organization presents itself to its publics,
especially visually; and reputation is defined as the way key external stakeholder groups or
other interested parties actually conceptualize that organization” (p. 241). On the website of
the Reputation Institute (n.d.b.), the founder Fombrun asserted: “People often confuse the
words reputation, brand, and image. They mean different things … A company has many
different images and can have many brands. In contrast, a corporate reputation signals the
overall attractiveness of the company to all of its constituents, including employees,
customers, investors, reporters, and the general public.”
Others (e.g., Caruana & Chircop, 2000; Pruzan, 2001), on the other hand, emphasized
the association of the reputation concept to other terms. For example, Caruana and Chircop
(2000) analyzed the background of reputation research and stressed the interconnectedness of
terms: “Research on corporate reputation is rooted in earlier work on corporate image,
corporate identity and personality … Corporate reputation emerges from the images held by
various publics of an organization … Corporate reputation is closely related to brand equity”
(p. 43). Pruzan (2001) put more emphases on image and identity in explaining the emergence
of reputation: “There is no doubt that corporate reputation—in the sense of corporate


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