All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Exploring the Link Between the Concepts of Organization-Public Relationships and Organizational Reputations
Unformatted Document Text:  Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266 13 measures of cognitions, attitudes, or even reputations and relationships that are not based on direct experience” (p. 20). J. Grunig and Hung (2002) found from their empirical research that “reputational” cognitive representations are more likely to be superficial than “experiential” cognitive representations. For measuring reputation, Bromley (1993) recommended an open-end, qualitative method for method, “and to some extent quantitatively, by means of content analysis” (Bromley, 2000, p. 243). Bromley (1993) asked students to write a paragraph describing their instructor, and then coded the responses into different categories of attributes; he found that many of those students assigned the same attributes to the subject. J. Grunig and Hung (2002) explicated Bromley’s (1993) method of reputation measurement in identifying a taxonomy of cognitive representations, which includes other types of representations. Using “objects,” “attributes,” and the connections among them, they developed the following taxonomy of reputations: 1. An object-attribute representation: Objects and attributes associated through an isa 9 connection. For example, General Electric is a large company. 2. An object-object representation: Objects associated with other objects through an isa connection. For example, Bill Gates is president of Microsoft. 3. A behavioral representation: Agents or actors (one object) connected through an action or behavior to a recipient of that action (a second object). For example, AT & T fired 2,000 workers. 4. An evaluative representation: An object-attribute, object-object, or behavioral cognitive representation that contain an evaluative component or that consists of a pure attitudinal statement such as “Exxon is an evil company” (J. Grunig & Hung, 2002, p. 23). For this study, to measure reputations of the case study organization, the following research question was suggested: Research Question 2: How do participants perceive reputations that they hold of the case organization? Reputation scholars (e.g., Fombrun, 1996; King, 1999; Porter et al., 1995), if not all, recognized the effects of organizational behavior on reputation. For example, King (1999) said that organizational behavior improves corporate reputation. In addition, reputation scholars (e.g., Fombrun, 1996, p. 57) viewed relationships as a prerequisite antecedent for corporate reputation.

Authors: Yang, SungUn. and Mallabo, Jose.
first   previous   Page 13 of 35   next   last



background image
Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266
13
measures of cognitions, attitudes, or even reputations and relationships that are not based on
direct experience” (p. 20). J. Grunig and Hung (2002) found from their empirical research
that “reputational” cognitive representations are more likely to be superficial than
“experiential” cognitive representations.
For measuring reputation, Bromley (1993) recommended an open-end, qualitative
method for method, “and to some extent quantitatively, by means of content analysis”
(Bromley, 2000, p. 243). Bromley (1993) asked students to write a paragraph describing their
instructor, and then coded the responses into different categories of attributes; he found that
many of those students assigned the same attributes to the subject. J. Grunig and Hung (2002)
explicated Bromley’s (1993) method of reputation measurement in identifying a taxonomy of
cognitive representations, which includes other types of representations. Using “objects,”
“attributes,” and the connections among them, they developed the following taxonomy of
reputations:
1. An
object-attribute representation: Objects and attributes associated through an
isa
9
connection. For example, General Electric is a large company.
2. An
object-object representation: Objects associated with other objects through an
isa connection. For example, Bill Gates is president of Microsoft.
3. A
behavioral representation: Agents or actors (one object) connected through an
action or behavior to a recipient of that action (a second object). For example, AT
& T fired 2,000 workers.
4. An
evaluative representation: An object-attribute, object-object, or behavioral
cognitive representation that contain an evaluative component or that consists of a
pure attitudinal statement such as “Exxon is an evil company” (J. Grunig &
Hung, 2002, p. 23).
For this study, to measure reputations of the case study organization, the following research
question was suggested:
Research Question 2: How do participants perceive reputations that they hold of the
case organization?
Reputation scholars (e.g., Fombrun, 1996; King, 1999; Porter et al., 1995), if not all,
recognized the effects of organizational behavior on reputation. For example, King (1999)
said that organizational behavior improves corporate reputation. In addition, reputation
scholars (e.g., Fombrun, 1996, p. 57) viewed relationships as a prerequisite antecedent for
corporate reputation.


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 13 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.