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Exploring the Link Between the Concepts of Organization-Public Relationships and Organizational Reputations
Unformatted Document Text:  Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266 15 experiential relationships from reputational relationships. It is the authors’ contention that degree of experience with an organization, in general, can be used to measure level of involvement. However, because there may be a case in which a participant can have high level of involvement with indirect or no experience, the authors do not use the variable of involvement for this study. Finally, the following research question was suggested for this study to explore the link between the concepts of relationships and reputations (i.e., cognitive representations): Research Question 3: How participants’ different degree of direct experience with the case organization affects the link between their evaluation of relationships with the organization and their perception of organizational reputations? Methodology This study explored the concepts of relationships and reputation in public relations management. Qualitative methods were adopted to measure these concepts; this study conducted a case study of an environmental activist organization. Qualitative methods were recommended in measuring relationships or reputations (Bromley, 1993, 2000; J. Grunig, 2002; J. Grunig & Hung, 2002), because there are some situations in which these concepts “cannot always be reduced to a few fixed-response items on a questionnaire” and because more insight or detail can be induced from participants (J. Grunig, 2002, pp. 2-3). Also, case studies are the preferred strategy when the purpose of a study is “exploratory,” the investigator has little control over events, and the focus is on a contemporary phenomenon with some real-life context (Yin, 1994). Recognizing that there has been minimal research focusing on this topic of the link between relationships and reputations, a case study would be a proper method to “explore” these concepts of relationships and reputation. Interviews were adopted as an instrument for assessing the quality of relationships. For this study, seven one-hour long interviews were conducted using 13 questions (see the appendix) developed in J. Grunig and L. Grunig (2000) and J. Grunig (2002). In case studies, scholars (e.g., McCracken, 1988; Rockhill, 1982; Yin, 1994) suggested interviews as an effective instrument to collect data, given that, using interviews, the researcher can gather rich and valid data brought by participants in the most naturalistic settings. During interviews, 13 questions were asked to participants: among them, 3 questions were “grand-tour” questions examining degree of direct experience with the case organization; a questions for measuring second-order cognitive representations (i.e.,

Authors: Yang, SungUn. and Mallabo, Jose.
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Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266
15
experiential relationships from reputational relationships. It is the authors’ contention that
degree of experience with an organization, in general, can be used to measure level of
involvement. However, because there may be a case in which a participant can have high
level of involvement with indirect or no experience, the authors do not use the variable of
involvement for this study.
Finally, the following research question was suggested for this study to explore the
link between the concepts of relationships and reputations (i.e., cognitive representations):
Research Question 3: How participants’ different degree of direct experience with the
case organization affects the link between their evaluation of relationships with the
organization and their perception of organizational reputations?
Methodology
This study explored the concepts of relationships and reputation in public relations
management. Qualitative methods were adopted to measure these concepts; this study
conducted a case study of an environmental activist organization. Qualitative methods were
recommended in measuring relationships or reputations (Bromley, 1993, 2000; J. Grunig,
2002; J. Grunig & Hung, 2002), because there are some situations in which these concepts
“cannot always be reduced to a few fixed-response items on a questionnaire” and because
more insight or detail can be induced from participants (J. Grunig, 2002, pp. 2-3).
Also, case studies are the preferred strategy when the purpose of a study is
“exploratory,” the investigator has little control over events, and the focus is on a
contemporary phenomenon with some real-life context (Yin, 1994). Recognizing that there
has been minimal research focusing on this topic of the link between relationships and
reputations, a case study would be a proper method to “explore” these concepts of
relationships and reputation.
Interviews were adopted as an instrument for assessing the quality of relationships.
For this study, seven one-hour long interviews were conducted using 13 questions (see the
appendix) developed in J. Grunig and L. Grunig (2000) and J. Grunig (2002). In case studies,
scholars (e.g., McCracken, 1988; Rockhill, 1982; Yin, 1994) suggested interviews as an
effective instrument to collect data, given that, using interviews, the researcher can gather
rich and valid data brought by participants in the most naturalistic settings.
During interviews, 13 questions were asked to participants: among them, 3 questions
were “grand-tour” questions examining degree of direct experience with the case
organization; a questions for measuring second-order cognitive representations (i.e.,


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