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Exploring the Link Between the Concepts of Organization-Public Relationships and Organizational Reputations
Unformatted Document Text:  Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266 16 reputation); 8 questions for measuring Hon and J. Grunig’s (1999) six dimensions of relationships; and a question for closing interviews. Since this study focuses on measuring six dimensions of relationships, the question asking strategies for cultivating relationship is not used here. Sampling About measuring organization-public relationships, J. Grunig (2002) suggested using qualitative methods: “Qualitative methods, for example, would be most useful for research with leaders of activist groups, government officials, or journalists who might not respond to a questionnaire or from whom more depth information can be gained” (p. 3). When selecting the case, finding an organization with crises was considered. Fombrun and Van Riel (1997, p. 5) maintained that a reputation becomes “noticed” when it is threatened by organizational crises. As a case organization, therefore, an environmental activist organization in Korea was selected for this study, which faced organizational crises due to the founder’s management misconduct. In selecting participants for interviews, this study purposively sampled (i.e., non- probability sampling) participants, varying degree of experience with the organization, in order to look at how participants’ evaluation of relationships with the case organization and their perception of organizational reputation is linked with each other. For the reason, this study selected three participants having direct experience with the organization: a journalist specialized in environmental issues as well as a member of the case organization, a public relations manager in a multinational company that has sponsored the case organization, and a public relations professional in a coalition-partner organization (with the case organization). Then, to increase comparability among participants, this study selected four participants from members of the general population having indirect/no experience: two professionals (a doctor and a minister), and other two participants (a male and a female). Solicitation e-mail was first sent to potential participants, and the researcher inquired by the phone if they would be willing to participate in an interview for an hour to answer relationships and reputations that they have of the organization. They were informed that all participation will be completely voluntary and their identities will remain confidential. Procedure The first interview was conducted with a journalist on April 17, 2001. After a week, the second interview was conducted with a PR manager in a multinational company. The third interview was conducted with a PR professional in a coalition-partner organization, on

Authors: Yang, SungUn. and Mallabo, Jose.
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Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266
16
reputation); 8 questions for measuring Hon and J. Grunig’s (1999) six dimensions of
relationships; and a question for closing interviews. Since this study focuses on measuring six
dimensions of relationships, the question asking strategies for cultivating relationship is not
used here.
Sampling
About measuring organization-public relationships, J. Grunig (2002) suggested using
qualitative methods: “Qualitative methods, for example, would be most useful for research
with leaders of activist groups, government officials, or journalists who might not respond to
a questionnaire or from whom more depth information can be gained” (p. 3). When selecting
the case, finding an organization with crises was considered. Fombrun and Van Riel (1997, p.
5) maintained that a reputation becomes “noticed” when it is threatened by organizational
crises. As a case organization, therefore, an environmental activist organization in Korea was
selected for this study, which faced organizational crises due to the founder’s management
misconduct.
In selecting participants for interviews, this study purposively sampled (i.e., non-
probability sampling) participants, varying degree of experience with the organization, in
order to look at how participants’ evaluation of relationships with the case organization and
their perception of organizational reputation is linked with each other. For the reason, this
study selected three participants having direct experience with the organization: a journalist
specialized in environmental issues as well as a member of the case organization, a public
relations manager in a multinational company that has sponsored the case organization, and a
public relations professional in a coalition-partner organization (with the case organization).
Then, to increase comparability among participants, this study selected four participants from
members of the general population having indirect/no experience: two professionals (a doctor
and a minister), and other two participants (a male and a female).
Solicitation e-mail was first sent to potential participants, and the researcher inquired
by the phone if they would be willing to participate in an interview for an hour to answer
relationships and reputations that they have of the organization. They were informed that all
participation will be completely voluntary and their identities will remain confidential.
Procedure
The first interview was conducted with a journalist on April 17, 2001. After a week,
the second interview was conducted with a PR manager in a multinational company. The
third interview was conducted with a PR professional in a coalition-partner organization, on


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