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Exploring the Link Between the Concepts of Organization-Public Relationships and Organizational Reputations
Unformatted Document Text:  Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266 18 between the central and local governments, among politicians, and even among the residents of the area. Against the project, EAO has led a coalition of activists, in which various groups or organizations, from religious organizations to labor unions, have participated in pressuring the government to nullify the project. Meanwhile, this organization has faced series of organizational crises after the media exposed the founder’s management misconduct, such as the allegation of committing plagiarism (“Chosun Ilbo,”2000, September 19), taking bribes from a multinational company (“Chosun Ilbo,” 2000, March 17), and getting involved in politics (“Chosun Ilbo,” 2000, March 21). Grand-Tour Questions: Measuring Participants’ Degree of Experience Three “grand-tour” questions (see the appendix) were given to participants to investigate degree of experience with EAO. Indeed, these questions proved to be useful in distinguishing participants who had relationship history from those who do not; if relationship history existed, participants were examined about how direct relationships they had. In addition, the first of these grand-tour questions was designed to measure experiential cognitive representations participants have of the organization. After asking these three grand-tour questions, the following question was also asked to measure reputational cognitive representations: “Please describe what is generally said about the organization.” Research Question 1: How do participants evaluate their relationships with the case organization? Participants, according to their different degree of experience with EAO, were varied in their evaluation of relationships with EAO. Nevertheless, there appeared to be certain patterns in their way of evaluating relationships. First, concerning the relationship outcomes and types of relationships, there appeared to be a relationship: As long as they evaluated relationship outcomes negatively, participants tended to respond that their relationships with EAO were exchange relationships, rather than communal relationships, and vice versa. Second, participants without direct experience offered short and superficial responses in their evaluating relationships; sometimes they did not answer some questions by saying “no comment” or “I don’t know.” A participant said, for example: “No idea. I don’ t know. If you say something about the organization, I will try to make a judgment. But I don’t have any information to say or evaluate.” Especially, they often avoided answering questions measuring control mutuality and commitment. This may be because they had more difficulties answering to the dimensions of commitment and control mutuality based on

Authors: Yang, SungUn. and Mallabo, Jose.
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Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266
18
between the central and local governments, among politicians, and even among the residents
of the area.
Against the project, EAO has led a coalition of activists, in which various groups or
organizations, from religious organizations to labor unions, have participated in pressuring
the government to nullify the project. Meanwhile, this organization has faced series of
organizational crises after the media exposed the founder’s management misconduct, such as
the allegation of committing plagiarism (“Chosun Ilbo,”2000, September 19), taking bribes
from a multinational company (“Chosun Ilbo,” 2000, March 17), and getting involved in
politics (“Chosun Ilbo,” 2000, March 21).
Grand-Tour Questions: Measuring Participants’ Degree of Experience
Three “grand-tour” questions (see the appendix) were given to participants to
investigate degree of experience with EAO. Indeed, these questions proved to be useful in
distinguishing participants who had relationship history from those who do not; if
relationship history existed, participants were examined about how direct relationships they
had. In addition, the first of these grand-tour questions was designed to measure experiential
cognitive representations participants have of the organization. After asking these three
grand-tour questions, the following question was also asked to measure reputational
cognitive representations: “Please describe what is generally said about the organization.”
Research Question 1: How do participants evaluate their relationships with the case
organization?
Participants, according to their different degree of experience with EAO, were varied
in their evaluation of relationships with EAO. Nevertheless, there appeared to be certain
patterns in their way of evaluating relationships. First, concerning the relationship outcomes
and types of relationships, there appeared to be a relationship: As long as they evaluated
relationship outcomes negatively, participants tended to respond that their relationships with
EAO were exchange relationships, rather than communal relationships, and vice versa.
Second, participants without direct experience offered short and superficial responses
in their evaluating relationships; sometimes they did not answer some questions by saying
“no comment” or “I don’t know.” A participant said, for example: “No idea. I don’ t know. If
you say something about the organization, I will try to make a judgment. But I don’t have
any information to say or evaluate.” Especially, they often avoided answering questions
measuring control mutuality and commitment. This may be because they had more
difficulties answering to the dimensions of commitment and control mutuality based on


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