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Exploring the Link Between the Concepts of Organization-Public Relationships and Organizational Reputations
Unformatted Document Text:  Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266 23 relationships and reporting their cognitive representations. According to one of them, “I have sort of relationships with the organization. I don’t think we [the media] like it, though. In my opinion, only EAO tries to make special ‘ties’ with us. Personally, both my daughter and I are members of the organization. Also, I worked for a municipal board to audit the budget for many NGOs, including EAO. From my personal experience, when I think about EAO. The first thing in my mind is ‘the founder is political,’ ‘he [the founder] has good leadership,’ ‘EAO is the largest environmental activist organization in Korea,’ and so forth.” Another participant offered an insight on how an organization can overcome negative cognitive representations (i.e., reputation) by building quality relationships: “Before working with EAO, many in my organization actually worried about negative reputations people had of it. And, you know, my organization is a religious organization, so we were ‘very’ sensitive about rumor or scandals of EAO. But, considering the size and nature of the organization, isn’t it okay to get financial support from companies? Otherwise, how can they manage such a big organization without financial sources? People said it took ‘bribes’ but we [members in the religious organization] consider EAO got ‘financial support.’ Because we are satisfied in working with EAO, we don’t care those scandals.” When reputations affect the evaluation of relationships. Participants without direct relationship history tended to evaluate relationships based on cognitive representations they had of the case organization. These participants offered limited and superficial answers throughout the interviews. Sometimes, they avoided answering some of questions for measuring relationships due to their lack of relationship history. A participant among them said, for example: “Are you asking my satisfaction with EAO? I don’t know. But, from what I heard, I don’t hold of much positive opinion of it. Basically, I don’t have ‘any’ interest in that kind of organization.” Another participant of them responded: “I heard about the organization from my husband. He said the founder of EAO is little bit ‘political,’ so people like my husband don’t like what EAO does. I don’t know if I can call this a relationship with EAO. If I can, my relationships with EAO would be bad.” There were participants who failed to recognize the case organization at all. As a consequence, they had extreme difficulties answering questions for measuring relationships and cognitive representations. For example, one of them fairly guessed about the case organization: “Which organization? I haven’t heard about it. I can just guess what kind of organization it is from its name. It is kind of an environmental organization, isn’t it?” Conclusion

Authors: Yang, SungUn. and Mallabo, Jose.
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Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266
23
relationships and reporting their cognitive representations. According to one of them, “I have
sort of relationships with the organization. I don’t think we [the media] like it, though. In my
opinion, only EAO tries to make special ‘ties’ with us. Personally, both my daughter and I
are members of the organization. Also, I worked for a municipal board to audit the budget for
many NGOs, including EAO. From my personal experience, when I think about EAO. The
first thing in my mind is ‘the founder is political,’ ‘he [the founder] has good leadership,’
‘EAO is the largest environmental activist organization in Korea,’ and so forth.”
Another participant offered an insight on how an organization can overcome negative
cognitive representations (i.e., reputation) by building quality relationships: “Before working
with EAO, many in my organization actually worried about negative reputations people had
of it. And, you know, my organization is a religious organization, so we were ‘very’ sensitive
about rumor or scandals of EAO. But, considering the size and nature of the organization,
isn’t it okay to get financial support from companies? Otherwise, how can they manage such
a big organization without financial sources? People said it took ‘bribes’ but we [members in
the religious organization] consider EAO got ‘financial support.’ Because we are satisfied in
working with EAO, we don’t care those scandals.”
When reputations affect the evaluation of relationships. Participants without direct
relationship history tended to evaluate relationships based on cognitive representations they
had of the case organization. These participants offered limited and superficial answers
throughout the interviews. Sometimes, they avoided answering some of questions for
measuring relationships due to their lack of relationship history. A participant among them
said, for example: “Are you asking my satisfaction with EAO? I don’t know. But, from what
I heard, I don’t hold of much positive opinion of it. Basically, I don’t have ‘any’ interest in
that kind of organization.” Another participant of them responded: “I heard about the
organization from my husband. He said the founder of EAO is little bit ‘political,’ so people
like my husband don’t like what EAO does. I don’t know if I can call this a relationship with
EAO. If I can, my relationships with EAO would be bad.”
There were participants who failed to recognize the case organization at all.
As a consequence, they had extreme difficulties answering questions for measuring
relationships and cognitive representations. For example, one of them fairly guessed about
the case organization: “Which organization? I haven’t heard about it. I can just guess what
kind of organization it is from its name. It is kind of an environmental organization, isn’t it?”
Conclusion


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