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Exploring the Link Between the Concepts of Organization-Public Relationships and Organizational Reputations
Unformatted Document Text:  Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266 25 public relations can be best estimated with non-economic indicators such as relationship indicators, rather than calculating financial returns produced by the public relations practice (see more about non-economic indicators and the value of relationships in L. Grunig, J. Grunig, & Dozier, 2002, pp. 103-107). Regarding this, Heath (2000) argued that a relationship development rationale for public relations can justify a revenue enhancement paradigm, but “probably more indirectly than is assumed by many practitioners who devote attention to media relations, publicity, and promotion” (p. 2). Business scholars who focus on visible financial returns like most public relations practitioners, however, have also increasingly advocated relationship management. Scholars (Reichheld, 1996; Schwaiger & Locarek-Junge, 1998) argued that the evidence of having quality relationships with publics is “overwhelming” and discussed the value of relationship management similarly with public relations scholars. A business academic Peppard (2000), for example, advocated relationship management since “retained customers [by relationship management] is inevitably more profitable” (p. 321). Although public relations professionals need to consider and measure the reputation concept, the results of this study supported J. Grunig and Hung’s (2002) study, providing evidence that public relations professionals can support an organization by building and developing good relationships with key publics—publics who have direct experience with an organization and, hence, who have most likely to create salient consequences on an organization’s autonomy on its decision-making. The results of this case study suggested that, even if an organization has been struggling with negative reputations, negative reputations can be improved by building and maintaining good relationships with publics. This is why public relations should concentrate on quality relationship management so as to demonstrate and enhance the value of public relations. In light of organization-public relationships, it is proposed that there may be lower probability for publics with indirect/no experience with an organization, than publics with direct experience, to have consequences on an organization. These publics are most likely to depend on reputational cognitive representations (i.e., reputation based on what they heard) to evaluate their relationships with an organization. Since this second-order reputation is not formed by direct experience with an organization, but often by the media indirectly, the consequence would be relatively weaker than experiential relationships of key publics. Limitations

Authors: Yang, SungUn. and Mallabo, Jose.
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Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266
25
public relations can be best estimated with non-economic indicators such as relationship
indicators, rather than calculating financial returns produced by the public relations practice
(see more about non-economic indicators and the value of relationships in L. Grunig, J.
Grunig, & Dozier, 2002, pp. 103-107). Regarding this, Heath (2000) argued that a
relationship development rationale for public relations can justify a revenue enhancement
paradigm, but “probably more indirectly than is assumed by many practitioners who devote
attention to media relations, publicity, and promotion” (p. 2).
Business scholars who focus on visible financial returns like most public relations
practitioners, however, have also increasingly advocated relationship management. Scholars
(Reichheld, 1996; Schwaiger & Locarek-Junge, 1998) argued that the evidence of having
quality relationships with publics is “overwhelming” and discussed the value of relationship
management similarly with public relations scholars. A business academic Peppard (2000),
for example, advocated relationship management since “retained customers [by relationship
management] is inevitably more profitable” (p. 321).
Although public relations professionals need to consider and measure the reputation
concept, the results of this study supported J. Grunig and Hung’s (2002) study, providing
evidence that public relations professionals can support an organization by building and
developing good relationships with key publics—publics who have direct experience with an
organization and, hence, who have most likely to create salient consequences on an
organization’s autonomy on its decision-making. The results of this case study suggested
that, even if an organization has been struggling with negative reputations, negative
reputations can be improved by building and maintaining good relationships with publics.
This is why public relations should concentrate on quality relationship management so as to
demonstrate and enhance the value of public relations.
In light of organization-public relationships, it is proposed that there may be lower
probability for publics with indirect/no experience with an organization, than publics with
direct experience, to have consequences on an organization. These publics are most likely to
depend on reputational cognitive representations (i.e., reputation based on what they heard)
to evaluate their relationships with an organization. Since this second-order reputation is not
formed by direct experience with an organization, but often by the media indirectly, the
consequence would be relatively weaker than experiential relationships of key publics.
Limitations


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