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Exploring the Link Between the Concepts of Organization-Public Relationships and Organizational Reputations
Unformatted Document Text:  Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266 3 Exploring the Link Between the Concepts of Organization-Public Relationships and Organizational Reputations Over the past few years, scholars and practitioners have increased their focus on relationship management in public relations (Bruning & Ledingham, 1999, 2000; J. Grunig & Hung, 2002; L. Grunig, J. Grunig, & Dozier, 2002; Ledingham, 2001; Ledingham & Bruning, 1998, 2000). Practitioners, on the other hand, have expanded their efforts into reputation management. PR Week, in a recent editorial, described how rampant the growth of reputation management has been in the field of public relations: “In fact, with everyone jumping on the reputation bandwagon these days, reputation management products are becoming as ubiquitous as hot-dog vendors in Manhattan” (Staff, 1999, November 15). Discussing practitioners’ concentration on the reputation concept, Ver i (2000) once stated in a presentation to the IABC International Conference in Vancouver: “For nearly a century, the public relations profession has been trying to disassociate itself from the image of being a profession about image-making. It is therefore a pity that it tries to redefine itself as reputation management—which is basically the same as image-making” (p. 4). On the website of the Reputation Institute, Fombrun (n.d.a) defined a reputation as “a cognitive representation of a company’s ability to meet the expectations of its stakeholders; reputation describes the rational and emotional attachments that stakeholders form with a company; and reputation describes the net image a company develops with all of its stakeholders.” According to Deephouse (2002, p. 9), reputation management was catalyzed in the 1990s by Fortune magazine. He argued that interest in reputation management in the United States grew, following the lead of Fortune magazine’s ‘Most Admired Corporations’ survey; other magazines and public interest groups began evaluating corporations and publishing their findings to the public. As reputation surveys become popular in business, academic and commercial publications emerged with a focus solely on reputation management (Hutton, Goodman, Alexander, & Genest, 2001, p. 247). In 1997, scholars launched Corporate Reputation Review to address the proliferating demands by practitioners for answers to questions about reputation management (Fombrun & Van Riel, 1997, p. 5). Practitioners also launched a trade publication, Reputation Management, several years ago (Hutton et al., 2001, 247-248). In turn, PR Week argued that reputation management helped practitioners “promote the viability of public relations” (“PR Week,” 1999, March 29) by demonstrating that public

Authors: Yang, SungUn. and Mallabo, Jose.
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Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266
3
Exploring the Link Between the Concepts of Organization-Public Relationships and
Organizational Reputations
Over the past few years, scholars and practitioners have increased their focus on
relationship management in public relations (Bruning & Ledingham, 1999, 2000; J. Grunig &
Hung, 2002; L. Grunig, J. Grunig, & Dozier, 2002; Ledingham, 2001; Ledingham &
Bruning, 1998, 2000). Practitioners, on the other hand, have expanded their efforts into
reputation management. PR Week, in a recent editorial, described how rampant the growth of
reputation management has been in the field of public relations: “In fact, with everyone
jumping on the reputation bandwagon these days, reputation management products are
becoming as ubiquitous as hot-dog vendors in Manhattan” (Staff, 1999, November 15).
Discussing practitioners’ concentration on the reputation concept, Ver i (2000) once
stated in a presentation to the IABC International Conference in Vancouver: “For nearly a
century, the public relations profession has been trying to disassociate itself from the image
of being a profession about image-making. It is therefore a pity that it tries to redefine itself
as reputation management—which is basically the same as image-making” (p. 4).
On the website of the Reputation Institute, Fombrun (n.d.a) defined a reputation as “a
cognitive representation of a company’s ability to meet the expectations of its stakeholders;
reputation describes the rational and emotional attachments that stakeholders form with a
company; and reputation describes the net image a company develops with all of its
stakeholders.”
According to Deephouse (2002, p. 9), reputation management was catalyzed in the
1990s by Fortune magazine. He argued that interest in reputation management in the United
States grew, following the lead of Fortune magazine’s ‘Most Admired Corporations’ survey;
other magazines and public interest groups began evaluating corporations and publishing
their findings to the public.
As reputation surveys become popular in business, academic and commercial
publications emerged with a focus solely on reputation management (Hutton, Goodman,
Alexander, & Genest, 2001, p. 247). In 1997, scholars launched Corporate Reputation
Review to address the proliferating demands by practitioners for answers to questions about
reputation management (Fombrun & Van Riel, 1997, p. 5). Practitioners also launched a
trade publication, Reputation Management, several years ago (Hutton et al., 2001, 247-248).
In turn, PR Week argued that reputation management helped practitioners “promote
the viability of public relations” (“PR Week,” 1999, March 29) by demonstrating that public


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