All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Exploring the Link Between the Concepts of Organization-Public Relationships and Organizational Reputations
Unformatted Document Text:  Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266 5 a much stronger theoretical and empirical link to relationships than to reputation, and that relationships should be focus of evaluation research in public relations” (p. 43). The proposed study is aimed at contributing to the body of knowledge in public relations by exploring the concepts of relationships and reputations, as in J. Grunig and Hung’s (2002) study. Specifically, this study would support J. Grunig and Hung’s (2002) earlier work using qualitative methods, employing a case study of an environmental activist organization facing organizational crises due to the founder’s management misconduct. This study will explore the concepts of relationships and reputations in three aspects: (1) How participants evaluate their relationships with the case organization, (2) how participants perceive reputations that they hold of the case organization; and (3) how participants’ different degree of experience with the case organization affects the link between their evaluation of relationships with the organization and their perception of the organizational reputations. Conceptualization Relationship Management in PR Practitioners and scholars in public relations have long strived to define the practice, and searched a concept to demonstrate the value of public relations to an organization and society (Cutlip et al., 2000; Bruning & Ledingham, 1999; Heath, 2001, Huang, 2001; J. Grunig & Hung, 2002; J. Grunig & Hunt, 1984; Ledingham & Bruning, 2000). The question of how to demonstrate the value of public relations to an organization has remained largely unanswered and controversial before a research project on excellence in public relations and communication management (called the Excellence study), conducted for the IABC Research Foundation. In this research project, J. Grunig and his colleagues (1992, pp. 1-2) initiated systematic research on to find the answer to this question. The IABC research team first explored “what it means for an organization to be effective” with the goal of finding out “why public relations makes it more effective” (Hon & J. Grunig, 1999, p. 7). From the literature on the subject of organizational effectiveness 1 , J. Grunig and his colleagues (1992) found that the value of public relations to an organization is in the function of helping an organization select and achieve its goals, despite the presence of much conflict with publics in achieving goals (see J. Grunig & Repper, 1992, pp. 117-158; J. Grunig & Huang, 2000, pp. 30-33). For this reason, the Excellence study concluded that public relations can contribute to organizational effectiveness by (1) “identifying the key publics (i.e., strategic constituents, or

Authors: Yang, SungUn. and Mallabo, Jose.
first   previous   Page 5 of 35   next   last



background image
Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266
5
a much stronger theoretical and empirical link to relationships than to reputation, and that
relationships should be focus of evaluation research in public relations” (p. 43).
The proposed study is aimed at contributing to the body of knowledge in public
relations by exploring the concepts of relationships and reputations, as in J. Grunig and
Hung’s (2002) study. Specifically, this study would support J. Grunig and Hung’s (2002)
earlier work using qualitative methods, employing a case study of an environmental activist
organization facing organizational crises due to the founder’s management misconduct. This
study will explore the concepts of relationships and reputations in three aspects: (1) How
participants evaluate their relationships with the case organization, (2) how participants
perceive reputations that they hold of the case organization; and (3) how participants’
different degree of experience with the case organization affects the link between their
evaluation of relationships with the organization and their perception of the organizational
reputations.
Conceptualization
Relationship Management in PR
Practitioners and scholars in public relations have long strived to define the practice,
and searched a concept to demonstrate the value of public relations to an organization and
society (Cutlip et al., 2000; Bruning & Ledingham, 1999; Heath, 2001, Huang, 2001; J.
Grunig & Hung, 2002; J. Grunig & Hunt, 1984; Ledingham & Bruning, 2000). The question
of how to demonstrate the value of public relations to an organization has remained largely
unanswered and controversial before a research project on excellence in public relations and
communication management (called the Excellence study), conducted for the IABC Research
Foundation. In this research project, J. Grunig and his colleagues (1992, pp. 1-2) initiated
systematic research on to find the answer to this question. The IABC research team first
explored “what it means for an organization to be effective” with the goal of finding out
“why public relations makes it more effective” (Hon & J. Grunig, 1999, p. 7).
From the literature on the subject of organizational effectiveness
1
, J. Grunig and his
colleagues (1992) found that the value of public relations to an organization is in the function
of helping an organization select and achieve its goals, despite the presence of much conflict
with publics in achieving goals (see J. Grunig & Repper, 1992, pp. 117-158; J. Grunig &
Huang, 2000, pp. 30-33).
For this reason, the Excellence study concluded that public relations can contribute to
organizational effectiveness by (1) “identifying the key publics (i.e., strategic constituents, or


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 5 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.