All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Exploring the Link Between the Concepts of Organization-Public Relationships and Organizational Reputations
Unformatted Document Text:  Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266 6 key publics) that develop because of the consequences that organizations and publics have on each other,” and (2) “using symmetrical communication programs 2 to develop and maintain quality relationships with these key publics” (L. Grunig, J. Grunig, & Dozier, 2002, p. 548). Based on these results of the Excellence Study, Hon and J. Grunig (1999) argued that the value of public relations is in relationships that an organization develops and maintains with key publics. According to Hon and J. Grunig (1999), “effective organizations choose and achieve appropriate goals because they develop relationships with publics,” whereas “ineffective organizations cannot achieve their goals, at least in part, because their publics do not support and typically oppose management efforts to achieve what publics consider illegitimate goals” (p. 8). In a study of over 300 organizations in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom, Dozier, L. Grunig, and J. Grunig (1995) empirically found that effective organizations differ in the affects of “quality relationships” and “conflict avoidance” that result from effective public relations programs to communicate with key publics (Dozier et al., pp. 226-229). In addition to this focus on the value of public relations to an organization, scholars (e.g., J. Grunig & L. Grunig, 1996, 2001; Kruckeberg, 2000; Kruckeberg & Stark, 1988; Ledingham, 2001; Stark & Kruckeberg, 2000) have also examined the value of the profession to society using the concept of relationship management. Earlier, Kruckeberg and Stark (1988) explained the social role of public relations: “Public relations is best described and practiced as the active attempt to restore and maintain a sense of community” (cited in Stark & Kruckeberg, 2000, p. 51). Ledingham (2001) found, from a study of government-citizen relationships, that the public relations function contributes to community building by quality relationships. A sense of community, or community building, begins from the idea that an organization often has consequence beyond its own bottom line and affects members of society by relationships (J. Grunig & Hunt, 1984; J. Grunig & L. Grunig, 2001). Therefore, according to J. Grunig and L. Grunig (2001), “organizations cannot be said to be effective unless they are socially responsible; and public relations adds value to society by contributing to the ethical behavior and the social responsibility of organizations” (p. 8). As the IABC research team found that public relations has the value to an organization and society by quality and long-term relationship management with key publics, “an increasing number of scholars are adopting the perspective that public relations should be viewed as the management of a relationship between organizations and publics” (Bruning & Ledingham, 1999, p. 157). In addition to the academic attention to relationship management,

Authors: Yang, SungUn. and Mallabo, Jose.
first   previous   Page 6 of 35   next   last



background image
Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266
6
key publics) that develop because of the consequences that organizations and publics have on
each other,” and (2) “using symmetrical communication programs
2
to develop and maintain
quality relationships with these key publics” (L. Grunig, J. Grunig, & Dozier, 2002, p. 548).
Based on these results of the Excellence Study, Hon and J. Grunig (1999) argued that
the value of public relations is in relationships that an organization develops and maintains
with key publics. According to Hon and J. Grunig (1999), “effective organizations choose
and achieve appropriate goals because they develop relationships with publics,” whereas
“ineffective organizations cannot achieve their goals, at least in part, because their publics do
not support and typically oppose management efforts to achieve what publics consider
illegitimate goals” (p. 8). In a study of over 300 organizations in the United States, Canada,
and the United Kingdom, Dozier, L. Grunig, and J. Grunig (1995) empirically found that
effective organizations differ in the affects of “quality relationships” and “conflict
avoidance” that result from effective public relations programs to communicate with key
publics (Dozier et al., pp. 226-229).
In addition to this focus on the value of public relations to an organization, scholars
(e.g., J. Grunig & L. Grunig, 1996, 2001; Kruckeberg, 2000; Kruckeberg & Stark, 1988;
Ledingham, 2001; Stark & Kruckeberg, 2000) have also examined the value of the profession
to society using the concept of relationship management. Earlier, Kruckeberg and Stark
(1988) explained the social role of public relations: “Public relations is best described and
practiced as the active attempt to restore and maintain a sense of community” (cited in Stark
& Kruckeberg, 2000, p. 51). Ledingham (2001) found, from a study of government-citizen
relationships, that the public relations function contributes to community building by quality
relationships. A sense of community, or community building, begins from the idea that an
organization often has consequence beyond its own bottom line and affects members of
society by relationships (J. Grunig & Hunt, 1984; J. Grunig & L. Grunig, 2001). Therefore,
according to J. Grunig and L. Grunig (2001), “organizations cannot be said to be effective
unless they are socially responsible; and public relations adds value to society by contributing
to the ethical behavior and the social responsibility of organizations” (p. 8).
As the IABC research team found that public relations has the value to an
organization and society by quality and long-term relationship management with key publics,
“an increasing number of scholars are adopting the perspective that public relations should be
viewed as the management of a relationship between organizations and publics” (Bruning &
Ledingham, 1999, p. 157). In addition to the academic attention to relationship management,


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 6 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.