All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Exploring the Link Between the Concepts of Organization-Public Relationships and Organizational Reputations
Unformatted Document Text:  Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266 8 as for identifying a set of communication strategies that practitioners can use to maintain relationships. The development in defining relationships, in turn, facilitated the development of measures of relationships. Earlier, Broom and Dozier (1990, pp. 82-83) pointed out difficulties in developing measures of relationships: “Conceptually, public relations programs affect the relationships between organizations and their publics, but rarely program impact on the relationships themselves measured.” Recently, Hon and J. Grunig (1999) identified two types of relationships and Huang (1997, 2001) and J. Grunig and Huang (2000) identified four relationship outcomes that can be used to measure the quality of long-term organization- public relationships. Using these six dimensions of relationships, J. Grunig and L. Grunig (2001) and Hon and J. Grunig (1999) developed guidelines for measuring relationships, which can be used in both qualitative and quantitative research. Measuring Organization-Public Relationships Regarding why it is important to measure relationships in public relations, Hon and J. Grunig (1999) maintained that the fundamental goal of public relations is to build and then enhance on-going or long-term relationships with key publics (p. 2). However, in spite of the fact that tools and techniques for measuring the outputs and outcomes 7 of specific public relations programs have existed for a number of years, measuring the quality of on-going relationships have been underdeveloped (Hon & J. Grunig, 1999). Furthermore, besides the short-term outputs, the outcomes of communication process are “almost always one-way (only effects on publics were measured) and asymmetrical (the purpose of public relations was seen as affecting publics for the benefit of client organizations)” (J. Grunig & Huang, 2000, p. 27). If the purpose of public relations is to build relationships, a measure of the effectiveness of public relations should be two-way by estimating effects on publics as well as management of an organization, as J. Grunig and Huang (2000) suggested. Another reason for measuring relationships is that, although it is important for an organization to measure PR outputs and outcomes, “its is even more important for an organization to measure relationships” (Hon & J. Grunig, 1999, p. 2), recognizing that the capacity for measuring the outcomes and the outputs, in general, are limited in a “particular public relations program or event that has been undertaken.” Therefore, Hon and J. Grunig (1999) suggested, through their research, that an organization can measure the quality of its long-term relationships with each strategic public

Authors: Yang, SungUn. and Mallabo, Jose.
first   previous   Page 8 of 35   next   last



background image
Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266
8
as for identifying a set of communication strategies that practitioners can use to maintain
relationships.
The development in defining relationships, in turn, facilitated the development of
measures of relationships. Earlier, Broom and Dozier (1990, pp. 82-83) pointed out
difficulties in developing measures of relationships: “Conceptually, public relations programs
affect the relationships between organizations and their publics, but rarely program impact on
the relationships themselves measured.” Recently, Hon and J. Grunig (1999) identified two
types of relationships and Huang (1997, 2001) and J. Grunig and Huang (2000) identified
four relationship outcomes that can be used to measure the quality of long-term organization-
public relationships. Using these six dimensions of relationships, J. Grunig and L. Grunig
(2001) and Hon and J. Grunig (1999) developed guidelines for measuring relationships,
which can be used in both qualitative and quantitative research.
Measuring Organization-Public Relationships
Regarding why it is important to measure relationships in public relations, Hon and J.
Grunig (1999) maintained that the fundamental goal of public relations is to build and then
enhance on-going or long-term relationships with key publics (p. 2). However, in spite of the
fact that tools and techniques for measuring the outputs and outcomes
7
of specific public
relations programs have existed for a number of years, measuring the quality of on-going
relationships have been underdeveloped (Hon & J. Grunig, 1999). Furthermore, besides the
short-term outputs, the outcomes of communication process are “almost always one-way
(only effects on publics were measured) and asymmetrical (the purpose of public relations
was seen as affecting publics for the benefit of client organizations)” (J. Grunig & Huang,
2000, p. 27). If the purpose of public relations is to build relationships, a measure of the
effectiveness of public relations should be two-way by estimating effects on publics as well
as management of an organization, as J. Grunig and Huang (2000) suggested.
Another reason for measuring relationships is that, although it is important for an
organization to measure PR outputs and outcomes, “its is even more important for an
organization to measure relationships” (Hon & J. Grunig, 1999, p. 2), recognizing that the
capacity for measuring the outcomes and the outputs, in general, are limited in a “particular
public relations program or event that has been undertaken.”
Therefore, Hon and J. Grunig (1999) suggested, through their research, that an
organization can measure the quality of its long-term relationships with each strategic public


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 8 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.