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Exploring the Link Between the Concepts of Organization-Public Relationships and Organizational Reputations
Unformatted Document Text:  Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266 9 (i.e., the value of the public relations function) by using the following six dimensions of relationships, which includes two types of relationships and four relationship outcomes: 1. Control mutuality is the degree to which parties agree on who has the rightful power to influence one another. Although some imbalance is natural, stable relationships require that organizations and publics each have some control over the other. 2. Trust is the level of confidence that both parties have in each other and their willingness to open themselves to the other party. Trust is a complicated concept, which has several underlying dimensions. One of these is integrity, the belief that an organization is fair and just. A second is dependability, the belief that an organization will do what it says it will do. A third is competence, the belief that an organization has the ability to do what it says it will do. 3. Satisfaction is the extent to which both parties feel favorably about each other because positive expectations about the relationship are reinforced. A satisfying relationship occurs when each party believes the other is engaging in positive steps to maintain the relationship. 4. Commitment is the extent to which both parties believe and feel that the relationship is worth spending energy on to maintain and promote. 5. In an exchange relationship, one party gives benefits to the other only because the other has provided benefits in the past or is expected to do so in the future. 6. In a communal relationship, both parties provide benefits to the other because they are concerned for the welfare of the other—even when they get nothing in return. For most public relations activities, developing communal relationships with key constituencies is much more important to achieve than would be developing exchange relationships (p. 3). In public relations, other scholars (e.g., Bruning, 2002; Bruning & Ledingham, 2000; Ledingham, 2001; Ledingham & Bruning, 1998, 2000) also have developed measures of relationships. For example, Ledingham and Bruning (1998) developed a scale for measuring relationships, which consist of relationship dimensions such as trust, openness, involvement, investment, and commitment. Ledingham and Bruning (1998) surveyed a total of 384 respondents, living in territories that were recently open to competition for local phone service, and found that respondents differ in their attitudes of staying with the current provider in accordance with these relationship dimensions. Most recently, Bruning (2002)

Authors: Yang, SungUn. and Mallabo, Jose.
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Tracking Number: ICA-15-10266
9
(i.e., the value of the public relations function) by using the following six dimensions of
relationships, which includes two types of relationships and four relationship outcomes:
1. Control mutuality is the degree to which parties agree on who has the rightful
power to influence one another. Although some imbalance is natural, stable
relationships require that organizations and publics each have some control over
the other.
2. Trust is the level of confidence that both parties have in each other and their
willingness to open themselves to the other party. Trust is a complicated concept,
which has several underlying dimensions. One of these is integrity, the belief that
an organization is fair and just. A second is dependability, the belief that an
organization will do what it says it will do. A third is competence, the belief that
an organization has the ability to do what it says it will do.
3. Satisfaction is the extent to which both parties feel favorably about each other
because positive expectations about the relationship are reinforced. A satisfying
relationship occurs when each party believes the other is engaging in positive
steps to maintain the relationship.
4. Commitment is the extent to which both parties believe and feel that the
relationship is worth spending energy on to maintain and promote.
5. In
an
exchange relationship, one party gives benefits to the other only because
the other has provided benefits in the past or is expected to do so in the future.
6. In
a
communal relationship, both parties provide benefits to the other because
they are concerned for the welfare of the other—even when they get nothing in
return. For most public relations activities, developing communal relationships
with key constituencies is much more important to achieve than would be
developing exchange relationships (p. 3).
In public relations, other scholars (e.g., Bruning, 2002; Bruning & Ledingham, 2000;
Ledingham, 2001; Ledingham & Bruning, 1998, 2000) also have developed measures of
relationships. For example, Ledingham and Bruning (1998) developed a scale for measuring
relationships, which consist of relationship dimensions such as trust, openness, involvement,
investment, and commitment. Ledingham and Bruning (1998) surveyed a total of 384
respondents, living in territories that were recently open to competition for local phone
service, and found that respondents differ in their attitudes of staying with the current
provider in accordance with these relationship dimensions. Most recently, Bruning (2002)


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