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E-motional Interaction Between Teaching Assistants and Students:Expressing emotions via WebCT
Unformatted Document Text:  Teaching, Emotion, & Technology 14 outside of the classroom, we first look at students’ ability and willingness to express their emotions via new technology, WebCT based e-mail. Second, we focus specifically on the emotional responses of teaching assistants, and also examine their ability and willingness to express emotion through computer-mediated instruction tools. Respondents Out of the four researchers, three were teaching assistants whose e-mails were analyzed. This fact was taken into consideration when the results were interpreted and the analysis was written. A fourth researcher, the one who did not teach this class in the same semester, presented an initial interpretation and created the themes of analysis. Again, she was not familiar with any of the email correspondence and was not teaching the course during the fall semester. Out of all e-mails written in the identified time period, only 74 were initiated by students and had responses by teaching assistants. All of the e-mail responses by TA’s were used for analysis in this study. These e-mails can be found in the Appendix 1. Each e-mail was assigned a number for easy tracking. All three teaching assistants’ names were replaced by “TA” and the names of students were changed for the purpose of confidentiality. In addition, any other information that can potentially lead to identification of a TA, such as office and telephone numbers, has been changed. The sex of the student was not taken into consideration when names of students were changed. Data analytic procedures First, three researchers read the e-mails initiated by students and responses written by TA’s and organized them into one file. Then, all e-mails were divided into four categories: student initiated e-mail with no emotion (SINE); student-initiated e-mail with emotion (SIWE); teaching assistant reply with no emotion (TARNE); and teaching assistant reply with emotion (TARWE). The bases for the categorization were the author of the message and expressed or not expressed emotion in each message.

Authors: Tsetsura, Katerina., Bigam, Mellisa., Buford, Laura. and Chen, Xiaolei.
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Teaching, Emotion, & Technology 14
outside of the classroom, we first look at students’ ability and willingness to express their emotions
via new technology, WebCT based e-mail. Second, we focus specifically on the emotional
responses of teaching assistants, and also examine their ability and willingness to express emotion
through computer-mediated instruction tools.
Respondents
Out of the four researchers, three were teaching assistants whose e-mails were analyzed.
This fact was taken into consideration when the results were interpreted and the analysis was
written. A fourth researcher, the one who did not teach this class in the same semester, presented an
initial interpretation and created the themes of analysis. Again, she was not familiar with any of the
email correspondence and was not teaching the course during the fall semester.
Out of all e-mails written in the identified time period, only 74 were initiated by students
and had responses by teaching assistants. All of the e-mail responses by TA’s were used for analysis
in this study. These e-mails can be found in the Appendix 1. Each e-mail was assigned a number for
easy tracking. All three teaching assistants’ names were replaced by “TA” and the names of
students were changed for the purpose of confidentiality. In addition, any other information that can
potentially lead to identification of a TA, such as office and telephone numbers, has been changed.
The sex of the student was not taken into consideration when names of students were changed.
Data analytic procedures
First, three researchers read the e-mails initiated by students and responses written by TA’s
and organized them into one file. Then, all e-mails were divided into four categories: student
initiated e-mail with no emotion (SINE); student-initiated e-mail with emotion (SIWE); teaching
assistant reply with no emotion (TARNE); and teaching assistant reply with emotion (TARWE).
The bases for the categorization were the author of the message and expressed or not expressed
emotion in each message.


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