All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

E-motional Interaction Between Teaching Assistants and Students:Expressing emotions via WebCT
Unformatted Document Text:  Teaching, Emotion, & Technology 16 After initial categorization by the fourth researcher, three other researchers analyzed the categories. It was decided that all researchers should agree on the themes identified. If disagreement arrived, the researchers engaged into a dialogue until they came up with the most suitable theme. Finally, after the authors determined and agreed upon the themes present within the e-mails, the e-mails were re-analyzed according to the major themes. After all e-mails were categorized and organized into themes, then an analysis of the themes took place. Analysis included a detailed examination of each category. Each of the three TA’s whose emails were used, were engaged into a modified simulated recall. The method of stimulated recall is one of the best alternatives available to examine communication and cognition during interaction (Waldron, & Cegala, 1992). It is used to help respondents remember actions and feelings during conversations (Frey, Botan, Friedman, & Kreps, 1991) or, in this case, writing emails to students. For the purpose of this study, the stimulated recall technique was modified: no writing of the feelings that respondents experienced at the time of writing emails was required because the recall was used as a secondary procedure to refine themes and clarify the discussion analysis. Results of the study All 74 student-initiated e-mails and the TA responses were analyzed and organized into two categories mentioned above: student initiated e-mail with no emotion (SINE); student-initiated e- mail with emotion (SIWE); teaching assistant reply with no emotion (TARNE); and teaching assistant reply with emotion (TARWE). There were 31 e-mails in the SINE condition, 43 in the SIWE condition, 25 in the TARNE condition, and 49 in the TARWE condition. RQ1: Do students express their emotions through electronic interaction with their teaching assistants via e-mail when the students are initiators of such communication?

Authors: Tsetsura, Katerina., Bigam, Mellisa., Buford, Laura. and Chen, Xiaolei.
first   previous   Page 16 of 67   next   last



background image
Teaching, Emotion, & Technology 16
After initial categorization by the fourth researcher, three other researchers analyzed the
categories. It was decided that all researchers should agree on the themes identified. If disagreement
arrived, the researchers engaged into a dialogue until they came up with the most suitable theme.
Finally, after the authors determined and agreed upon the themes present within the e-mails,
the e-mails were re-analyzed according to the major themes. After all e-mails were categorized and
organized into themes, then an analysis of the themes took place. Analysis included a detailed
examination of each category. Each of the three TA’s whose emails were used, were engaged into a
modified simulated recall. The method of stimulated recall is one of the best alternatives available
to examine communication and cognition during interaction (Waldron, & Cegala, 1992). It is used
to help respondents remember actions and feelings during conversations (Frey, Botan, Friedman, &
Kreps, 1991) or, in this case, writing emails to students. For the purpose of this study, the stimulated
recall technique was modified: no writing of the feelings that respondents experienced at the time of
writing emails was required because the recall was used as a secondary procedure to refine themes
and clarify the discussion analysis.
Results of the study
All 74 student-initiated e-mails and the TA responses were analyzed and organized into two
categories mentioned above: student initiated e-mail with no emotion (SINE); student-initiated e-
mail with emotion (SIWE); teaching assistant reply with no emotion (TARNE); and teaching
assistant reply with emotion (TARWE). There were 31 e-mails in the SINE condition, 43 in the
SIWE condition, 25 in the TARNE condition, and 49 in the TARWE condition.
RQ1: Do students express their emotions through electronic interaction with their teaching
assistants via e-mail when the students are initiators of such communication?


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 16 of 67   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.