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E-motional Interaction Between Teaching Assistants and Students:Expressing emotions via WebCT
Unformatted Document Text:  Teaching, Emotion, & Technology 18 You need to come and talk with me, because if you miss a speech, you fail the class. It is plainly stated in the syllabus that that is the policy. Derek’s reply to his TA’s e-mail again demonstrates the theme of apology, but also themes of disclosure and disappointment: Well I guess assuming a mistake can be fixed was wrong … [disappointment] I would like to make sure you know I did not do it purposefully as I felt you implied in your e-mail … I will not attend class tomorrow either because I have already failed it if I am under total understanding and I do not wish to make a fool of myself if I break down in tears [disclosure]. I apologize [apology] for thinking I could still do my speech, but I did by no means think that missing a speech was okay. As you put it. I do know the importance of college, and I am sorry [apology] that my alarm did not wake me up (#32b). In e-mail #32b, Derek’s apology begins to place the blame away from the situation (as phrased in #32) and toward his own actions. The e-mail becomes even more apologetic and intimate in response to the TA’s disappointment. Interestingly, Derek seems to hang on to the TA’s chosen words from e-mail #32a in his next e-mail. For example, phrases like “as I felt you implied” and “as you put it” are careful means of writing about the circumstances. According to DeSanctis and Monge (1998), when using CMC (computer-mediated communication), complex communication tasks take longer to perform, such as consensus formation or negotiation. DeSanctis and Monge (1998) also state that CMC also prolongs impression formation and comprehension because of the obvious lack of social cues. As we can see, the TA’s reply to Derek in e-mail #32c also reinforces her intended meanings and continues the theme of apology, while also demonstrating another TARWE theme: emotional support. She writes,

Authors: Tsetsura, Katerina., Bigam, Mellisa., Buford, Laura. and Chen, Xiaolei.
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Teaching, Emotion, & Technology 18
You need to come and talk with me, because if you miss a speech, you fail the class.
It is plainly stated in the syllabus that that is the policy.
Derek’s reply to his TA’s e-mail again demonstrates the theme of apology, but also themes
of disclosure and disappointment:
Well I guess assuming a mistake can be fixed was wrong … [disappointment] I
would like to make sure you know I did not do it purposefully as I felt you implied in
your e-mail … I will not attend class tomorrow either because I have already failed it
if I am under total understanding and I do not wish to make a fool of myself if I
break down in tears [disclosure]. I apologize [apology] for thinking I could still do
my speech, but I did by no means think that missing a speech was okay. As you put
it. I do know the importance of college, and I am sorry [apology] that my alarm did
not wake me up (#32b).
In e-mail #32b, Derek’s apology begins to place the blame away from the situation (as
phrased in #32) and toward his own actions. The e-mail becomes even more apologetic and intimate
in response to the TA’s disappointment. Interestingly, Derek seems to hang on to the TA’s chosen
words from e-mail #32a in his next e-mail. For example, phrases like “as I felt you implied” and “as
you put it” are careful means of writing about the circumstances.
According to DeSanctis and Monge (1998), when using CMC (computer-mediated
communication), complex communication tasks take longer to perform, such as consensus
formation or negotiation. DeSanctis and Monge (1998) also state that CMC also prolongs
impression formation and comprehension because of the obvious lack of social cues. As we can see,
the TA’s reply to Derek in e-mail #32c also reinforces her intended meanings and continues the
theme of apology, while also demonstrating another TARWE theme: emotional support. She writes,


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