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E-motional Interaction Between Teaching Assistants and Students:Expressing emotions via WebCT
Unformatted Document Text:  Teaching, Emotion, & Technology 19 I am sorry [apology] if my reply gave you the wrong impression. I certainly did not mean to imply that you did this on purpose for any means, but I just wanted to make sure you understood the gravity of the situation. I made no assumptions that you did not understand the importance of college … I would certainly be willing to look at options [emotional support] … I would like to continue any more discussion on the topic in person so we make sure there is no further miscommunication. Hope to see you tomorrow [emotional support] (#32c). The theme of apology also surfaced in e-mails in the closings of student-initiated e-mails: it is written to demonstrate that the student felt he or she was bothering the TA by sending an e-mail. As Appendix 2 notes, the major key word for e-mails seen as apologetic was “sorry.” For example, in e-mail #40 Floyd concludes, “Thanks and sorry about having to read a second e-mail,” to which the TA responds, “No need to apologize for asking a question, that is what I’m here for” (#40a). Similarly, another theme that surfaced in the closings of SIWE e-mails was that of thanks (e.g., e- mails 2, 3, 8, 11, 48, 50). In the previous reply (#40a), the TA exhibits another TARWE theme: disclosure. Disclosure was chosen to describe e-mails in which a TA disclosed personal or intimate information about herself. The spectrum of phrases for disclosure could range from a simple “it happens to all of us” (#32e) to a more complex personal reference about her life outside the classroom (e.g., her interests or hobbies). Certainly some of the most interesting SIWE e-mails were also categorized under the theme of disclosure. On a more personal level, student Sharon relates to her TA by mentioning the recent Thanksgiving holiday in an e-mail regarding a lost file attachment. She writes, “… have enough turkey and stuffing? I bet you had pumpkin pie, or something pumpkin;) see you tomorrow” (#71). The TA replies to Sharon (categorized as a TARWE disclosure) by writing, “Thanks for asking

Authors: Tsetsura, Katerina., Bigam, Mellisa., Buford, Laura. and Chen, Xiaolei.
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Teaching, Emotion, & Technology 19
I am sorry [apology] if my reply gave you the wrong impression. I certainly did not
mean to imply that you did this on purpose for any means, but I just wanted to make
sure you understood the gravity of the situation. I made no assumptions that you did
not understand the importance of college … I would certainly be willing to look at
options [emotional support] … I would like to continue any more discussion on the
topic in person so we make sure there is no further miscommunication. Hope to see
you tomorrow [emotional support] (#32c).
The theme of apology also surfaced in e-mails in the closings of student-initiated e-mails: it
is written to demonstrate that the student felt he or she was bothering the TA by sending an e-mail.
As Appendix 2 notes, the major key word for e-mails seen as apologetic was “sorry.” For example,
in e-mail #40 Floyd concludes, “Thanks and sorry about having to read a second e-mail,” to which
the TA responds, “No need to apologize for asking a question, that is what I’m here for” (#40a).
Similarly, another theme that surfaced in the closings of SIWE e-mails was that of thanks (e.g., e-
mails 2, 3, 8, 11, 48, 50).
In the previous reply (#40a), the TA exhibits another TARWE theme: disclosure. Disclosure
was chosen to describe e-mails in which a TA disclosed personal or intimate information about
herself. The spectrum of phrases for disclosure could range from a simple “it happens to all of us”
(#32e) to a more complex personal reference about her life outside the classroom (e.g., her interests
or hobbies).
Certainly some of the most interesting SIWE e-mails were also categorized under the theme
of disclosure. On a more personal level, student Sharon relates to her TA by mentioning the recent
Thanksgiving holiday in an e-mail regarding a lost file attachment. She writes, “… have enough
turkey and stuffing? I bet you had pumpkin pie, or something pumpkin;) see you tomorrow” (#71).
The TA replies to Sharon (categorized as a TARWE disclosure) by writing, “Thanks for asking


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