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E-motional Interaction Between Teaching Assistants and Students:Expressing emotions via WebCT
Unformatted Document Text:  Teaching, Emotion, & Technology 8 on the learning processes. Monk (2000) argued that emotions experienced by teachers are important in the overall learning experience of students in higher education and should be linked to the knowledge construction processes. Gates (2000) explored the concept of emotions and its influence on the process in higher education. He was particularly interested in emotional management (i.e., how teachers deal with their emotions, or how they hide and/or handle emotions in particular ways). Emphasizing the usage of emotions by teachers as a way of communicating particular affective norms, Gates pointed out that emotions are handled and regulated to create a productive learning environment. Student’s emotions, however, were not examined in this study, and Gates called upon further examination of emotions as they are experienced and expressed by students. The ways in which teachers should address students’ emotions were analyzed by Brookfield (1990), who argued that teachers should allow and assist students’ expression of their feelings. Rejecting the idea that the process of experiencing emotions is disruptive, Brookfield (see also Wilshire, 1990) discouraged teachers to neutralize their emotions and those of their students. A different position is held by Chickering and Reisser (1993) who wrote that the problem with some emotions is that they “seem to crop up unexpectedly and confront all of our hard work and planning” (p. 84). This position is supported by Crooks (1995) and Fried (1993). Thus, the appropriateness of emotions in the classroom and their implications is still under debate. Another important scope of literature on emotion presented at workplace needs to be examined here. Hochschild (1983) was a pioneer to study continuously experienced emotions at workplace. Hochschild was the first to draw attention to the complexity and importance of understanding and analyzing the emotional experience at workplace.

Authors: Tsetsura, Katerina., Bigam, Mellisa., Buford, Laura. and Chen, Xiaolei.
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Teaching, Emotion, & Technology 8
on the learning processes. Monk (2000) argued that emotions experienced by teachers are important
in the overall learning experience of students in higher education and should be linked to the
knowledge construction processes.
Gates (2000) explored the concept of emotions and its influence on the process in higher
education. He was particularly interested in emotional management (i.e., how teachers deal with
their emotions, or how they hide and/or handle emotions in particular ways). Emphasizing the usage
of emotions by teachers as a way of communicating particular affective norms, Gates pointed out
that emotions are handled and regulated to create a productive learning environment. Student’s
emotions, however, were not examined in this study, and Gates called upon further examination of
emotions as they are experienced and expressed by students.
The ways in which teachers should address students’ emotions were analyzed by Brookfield
(1990), who argued that teachers should allow and assist students’ expression of their feelings.
Rejecting the idea that the process of experiencing emotions is disruptive, Brookfield (see also
Wilshire, 1990) discouraged teachers to neutralize their emotions and those of their students.
A different position is held by Chickering and Reisser (1993) who wrote that the problem
with some emotions is that they “seem to crop up unexpectedly and confront all of our hard work
and planning” (p. 84). This position is supported by Crooks (1995) and Fried (1993). Thus, the
appropriateness of emotions in the classroom and their implications is still under debate.
Another important scope of literature on emotion presented at workplace needs to be
examined here. Hochschild (1983) was a pioneer to study continuously experienced emotions at
workplace. Hochschild was the first to draw attention to the complexity and importance of
understanding and analyzing the emotional experience at workplace.


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