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Developmental Differences in Younger and Older Adolescents’ Understanding of Heroism

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Abstract:

High school and college students viewed a 43-minute edited episode of a heroic action film and were then tested for their understanding of program themes as well as for their selection of role models. College students understood the abstract program messages about the duality of human existence (i.e., we have both good and evil qualities) better than high school students. Compassion and conscience were associated with the selection of a superhero as a role model. High school students and males were more likely to choose revenge as a viable response to intentional aggression. The results suggest that with maturity comes an understanding of the duality of human nature, and that the qualities of heroes that make them worthy of emulation involve prosocial, not antisocial, characteristics.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

student (57), batman (51), reveng (43), robin (43), evil (42), role (37), hero (37), shadow (37), 1 (37), 2 (37), model (32), school (32), colleg (32), particip (32), high (31), understand (31), good (30), charact (26), respons (26), program (24), face (24),

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developmental, media, psychology, heroism, Jung, morality, archetypes, Batman, superhero
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Association:
Name: International Communication Association
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http://www.icahdq.org


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URL: http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p112230_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Zehnder, Sean. and Calvert, Sandra. "Developmental Differences in Younger and Older Adolescents’ Understanding of Heroism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p112230_index.html>

APA Citation:

Zehnder, S. M. and Calvert, S. , 2003-05-27 "Developmental Differences in Younger and Older Adolescents’ Understanding of Heroism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p112230_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: High school and college students viewed a 43-minute edited episode of a heroic action film and were then tested for their understanding of program themes as well as for their selection of role models. College students understood the abstract program messages about the duality of human existence (i.e., we have both good and evil qualities) better than high school students. Compassion and conscience were associated with the selection of a superhero as a role model. High school students and males were more likely to choose revenge as a viable response to intentional aggression. The results suggest that with maturity comes an understanding of the duality of human nature, and that the qualities of heroes that make them worthy of emulation involve prosocial, not antisocial, characteristics.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 28
Word count: 6843
Text sample:
1 Developmental Differences in Younger and Older Adolescents’ Understanding of Heroism 2 Abstract High school and college students viewed a 43-minute edited episode of a heroic action film and were then tested for their understanding of program themes as well as for their selection of role models. College students understood the abstract program messages about the duality of human existence (i.e. we have both good and evil qualities) better than high school students. Compassion and conscience were associated with
& Martin C. (1998). Gender development. In W. Damon & N. Eisenberg (Eds.) Handbook of child psychology: Social emotional and personality development (5th ed.). New York: Wiley. 28 Terrill R. E. (1993). Put on a Happy Face: Batman as a Schizophrenic Savior. In Quarterly Journal of Speech Vol. 79. Voytilla S. (1999). Myth and the Movies: Discovering the mythic structure of 50 unforgettable films. Studio City: Michael Wiese Productions. Wartella E. (1980). Children and Television: The Development of the


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