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CRM/DRM: Infrastructure for the Celestial Jukebox
Unformatted Document Text:  technology practice forming in and around the Celestial Jukebox is yet to follow, but the Jukebox instantiates encapsulation and lockdown of the music and media that had once made up a substantial tract of the Internet commons. Bibliography ACLU, “Brief of the American Civil Liberties Union and the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California as Amici Curiae in Support of Reversal.” Available at http://www.aclunc.org/cyber/napster- brief.html. Alderman, J (2001). Sonic boom: Napster, MP3, and the New Pioneers of Music. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Press. Ang, I. (1991). Desperately Seeking the Audience . New York: Routledge. Aufderheide, P. (1999). Communications Policy and the Public Interest: the Telecommunications Act of 1996. New York: Guilford Press. Barnouw, E. (1978). The Sponsor: Notes of a Modern Potentate. NY: Oxford University Press. Beville, Jr., H. (1988). Audience Ratings: Radio, Television, Cable. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Brown, J. (2001). “The Music Revolution Will Not Be Digitized.” Salon, June 1. Available at http://www.salon.com/tech/feature/2001/06/01/digital_music/print.html. Camp, L. Jean. (2001). Trust and Risk in Internet Commerce. Boston: MIT Press. Deutsch, C. (2002). "Suit Settled Over Pricing of Music CD's at 3 Chains." New York Times, Feb. 1, C1. EPIC. (2002). Electronic Privacy Information Center Before the Technology Administration, Department of Commerce, Washington, DC 20230, In the Matter of Digital Entertainment and Rights Management, Comments of the Electronic Privacy Information Center July 17, 2002, http://www.epic.org/privacy/drm/tadrmcomments7.17.02.html Gates, W., with N. Myhrvold and P. Rinearson (1996). The Road Ahead. NY: Penguin Books. Hundt, R. (2000). You Say You Want a Revolution: A Story of Information Age Politics. New Haven: Yale University Press. Jones, S. (2002). “Music That Moves: Popular Music, Distribution, and Network Technologies.” Cultural Studies 16 (2), pp. 213-232. Lessig, L. (1999). Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace. New Yotk: Basic Books. McCourt and Burkart (2003) When Creators, Corporations, and Consumers Collide: Napster and the Development of On-line Music Distribution. Media, Culture and Society, in press.

Authors: Burkart, Patrick. and McCourt, Tom.
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technology practice forming in and around the Celestial Jukebox is yet to follow, but the Jukebox
instantiates encapsulation and lockdown of the music and media that had once made up a substantial
tract of the Internet commons.
Bibliography
ACLU, “Brief of the American Civil Liberties Union and the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern
California as Amici Curiae in Support of Reversal.” Available at http://www.aclunc.org/cyber/napster-
brief.html.
Alderman, J (2001). Sonic boom: Napster, MP3, and the New Pioneers of Music. Cambridge, MA:
Perseus Press.
Ang, I. (1991). Desperately Seeking the Audience . New York: Routledge.
Aufderheide, P. (1999). Communications Policy and the Public Interest: the Telecommunications Act of
1996. New York: Guilford Press.
Barnouw, E. (1978). The Sponsor: Notes of a Modern Potentate. NY: Oxford University Press.
Beville, Jr., H. (1988). Audience Ratings: Radio, Television, Cable. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum
Associates.
Brown, J. (2001). “The Music Revolution Will Not Be Digitized.” Salon, June 1. Available at
http://www.salon.com/tech/feature/2001/06/01/digital_music/print.html.
Camp, L. Jean. (2001). Trust and Risk in Internet Commerce. Boston: MIT Press.
Deutsch, C. (2002). "Suit Settled Over Pricing of Music CD's at 3 Chains." New York Times, Feb. 1,
C1.
EPIC. (2002). Electronic Privacy Information Center Before the Technology Administration, Department
of Commerce, Washington, DC 20230, In the Matter of Digital Entertainment and Rights
Management, Comments of the Electronic Privacy Information Center July 17, 2002,
http://www.epic.org/privacy/drm/tadrmcomments7.17.02.html
Gates, W., with N. Myhrvold and P. Rinearson (1996). The Road Ahead. NY: Penguin Books.
Hundt, R. (2000). You Say You Want a Revolution: A Story of Information Age Politics. New Haven:
Yale University Press.
Jones, S. (2002). “Music That Moves: Popular Music, Distribution, and Network Technologies.” Cultural
Studies 16 (2), pp. 213-232.
Lessig, L. (1999). Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace. New Yotk: Basic Books.
McCourt and Burkart (2003) When Creators, Corporations, and Consumers Collide: Napster and the
Development of On-line Music Distribution. Media, Culture and Society, in press.


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