All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Four Perspectives on the Role of Fear in Persuasion
Unformatted Document Text:  Four Perspectives on . . . 24 (Waldron & Cegala, 1992) might be adapted to address this problem. For example, asking message recipients to self-report their feelings while reading through a printed message would provide a much richer picture of the affective impact of message components than a post- message checklist. A similar end could be achieved via stimulated recall procedures in which subjects view a commercial advertisement once, then review it, stopping the tape and describing their affective reactions as they occurred. Although the design employed in the current study is the most modest of these alternatives, it demonstrates the utility of the message component approach for addressing questions of emotion dynamics and persuasion. Conclusion The primary contributions of this study to the literature on threat appeals can be summarized along the following lines. First, when presented with a health-related threat message, basic neurobiological differences predispose some individuals, and not others, to fear responses of greater intensity. There no evidence that these same differences influence the duration of that emotional response. Second, both the acceleration and velocity aspects of emotion can produce positive changes in the likelihood that individuals would take the health- protective action advocated by the message. However, fear deceleration possesses little, if any, suasory power. Third, there is no indication that the research designs necessary to assessing message-induced changes in emotion suffer from reactive measurement. Both theoretically and methodologically, these findings advance our understanding of the relationship between emotion and persuasion.

Authors: Dillard, James. and Anderson, Jason.
first   previous   Page 24 of 36   next   last



background image
Four Perspectives on . . .
24
(Waldron & Cegala, 1992) might be adapted to address this problem. For example, asking
message recipients to self-report their feelings while reading through a printed message would
provide a much richer picture of the affective impact of message components than a post-
message checklist. A similar end could be achieved via stimulated recall procedures in which
subjects view a commercial advertisement once, then review it, stopping the tape and describing
their affective reactions as they occurred. Although the design employed in the current study is
the most modest of these alternatives, it demonstrates the utility of the message component
approach for addressing questions of emotion dynamics and persuasion.
Conclusion
The primary contributions of this study to the literature on threat appeals can be
summarized along the following lines. First, when presented with a health-related threat
message, basic neurobiological differences predispose some individuals, and not others, to fear
responses of greater intensity. There no evidence that these same differences influence the
duration of that emotional response. Second, both the acceleration and velocity aspects of
emotion can produce positive changes in the likelihood that individuals would take the health-
protective action advocated by the message. However, fear deceleration possesses little, if any,
suasory power. Third, there is no indication that the research designs necessary to assessing
message-induced changes in emotion suffer from reactive measurement. Both theoretically and
methodologically, these findings advance our understanding of the relationship between emotion
and persuasion.


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 24 of 36   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.