All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Visiting the Borderless City: Traveling via the Internet
Unformatted Document Text:  acting out their dreams in famous New York locations. Each ad concluded with Giuliani saying ’The New York miracle--be a part of it!’ (Vagnoni, 2001). While these television spots invited people to experience quintessential New York phenomena like skating at Rockefeller Center or attending a Broadway show, within a month after the September 11 tragedy it became apparent that a central attraction for many visitors would be the remains of the World Trade Center towers. The reports of tourists coming to visit the site of the tragedy brought a mixed response. The mayor was initially reported to be offended by the spectacle (Brazil, 2001). Police and military personnel were directed to forbid photos and keep the crowds from standing on the sidewalk in front of the site (Woolridge, 2001). Screens were placed on the fence closing off the area to prevent people from observing the recovery efforts. However, in mid-November city officials changed their attitude toward visitors, and visiting the site where thousands were killed became accepted as a ’pilgrimage’ (New York Times, 2001). On announcing that a platform would be built for viewing the site, Mayor Giuliani stated, ’People have a very legitimate and honest interest in wanting to see it’ (Bone and Owen, 2001). On December 30, a thirteen foot high platform was completed that allowed people to see over the fence into the pit left by the collapsed towers. The wooden stage could hold up to fourhundred people at a time, and it soon became one of the most popular tourist sites in the city (Stewart, 2002). Thousands of people waited up to five hours in the cold for a chance to walk on to the platform. One police officer compared the scene of people pushing and yelling to a rock concert (Hays, 2002). In order to reduce this chaos, on January 9 the city began issuing free tickets to the platform. Two hundred and fifty tickets were issued for each half hour increment between 9 am and 8 pm (Cuza, 2002). This system would also allow people to spend more time

Authors: Fotsch, Paul.
first   previous   Page 11 of 31   next   last



background image
acting out their dreams in famous New York locations. Each ad concluded with Giuliani saying
’The New York miracle--be a part of it!’ (Vagnoni, 2001).
While these television spots invited people to experience quintessential New York
phenomena like skating at Rockefeller Center or attending a Broadway show, within a month
after the September 11 tragedy it became apparent that a central attraction for many visitors
would be the remains of the World Trade Center towers. The reports of tourists coming to visit
the site of the tragedy brought a mixed response. The mayor was initially reported to be
offended by the spectacle (Brazil, 2001). Police and military personnel were directed to forbid
photos and keep the crowds from standing on the sidewalk in front of the site (Woolridge, 2001).
Screens were placed on the fence closing off the area to prevent people from observing the
recovery efforts. However, in mid-November city officials changed their attitude toward visitors,
and visiting the site where thousands were killed became accepted as a ’pilgrimage’ (New York
Times, 2001). On announcing that a platform would be built for viewing the site, Mayor Giuliani
stated, ’People have a very legitimate and honest interest in wanting to see it’ (Bone and Owen,
2001).
On December 30, a thirteen foot high platform was completed that allowed people to see
over the fence into the pit left by the collapsed towers. The wooden stage could hold up to
fourhundred people at a time, and it soon became one of the most popular tourist sites in the city
(Stewart, 2002). Thousands of people waited up to five hours in the cold for a chance to walk on
to the platform. One police officer compared the scene of people pushing and yelling to a rock
concert (Hays, 2002). In order to reduce this chaos, on January 9 the city began issuing free
tickets to the platform. Two hundred and fifty tickets were issued for each half hour increment
between 9 am and 8 pm (Cuza, 2002). This system would also allow people to spend more time


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 11 of 31   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.