All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Visiting the Borderless City: Traveling via the Internet
Unformatted Document Text:  visiting other attractions in the city, and, from the perspective of businesses hurt by the decline in tourism, this meant more time to spend money. The introduction of tickets led several writers to compare the experience to a Disney ride (Usborne, 2002; Campbell, 2002). Moreover, the area surrounding Ground Zero took on signs of a theme park as vendors began selling merchandise related to the tragedy including framed photos of the wreckage and New York Fire Department caps. A report in the Christian Science Monitor noted a visitor from Chicago who complained that the souvenir stands were profiting off misery. One vendor seemed to agree with this sentiment: ’"Maybe there should be a moratorium on vending around here, at least for a week or two" . . . So why does he keep selling? "We have to feed our families," says Mr. Booker, a father of three in Harlem and an acquaintance of vendors who died on Sept. 11’ (MacDonald, 2002). In other words, while visitors are consuming images of Ground Zero, the jobs that depend on tourists require that these visitors make purchases to go along with their images. This is how a tourist attraction functions as part of the economy, and Ground Zero had become an official tourist attraction. The transformation of Ground Zero into a tourist attraction perfectly illustrates how locations can develop deep significance through their representation in the media. Ground Zero had been shaped for visual consumption. As one visitor commented, ’You see it on television all the time. Seeing it in person is very different’ (quoted in Givhan, 2001). The Internet adds a new dynamic to the visual construction of the location because even if television coverage declines and city officials try to shift the focus to other attractions, people can continue to pursue their interest online. While the ’New York Miracle’ ad campaign was promoting Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, Yahoo! was creating a category of ’first hand photos of the WTC and Pentagon attack’ that contained over 30 sites, each with multiple pictures. People could now browse over

Authors: Fotsch, Paul.
first   previous   Page 12 of 31   next   last



background image
visiting other attractions in the city, and, from the perspective of businesses hurt by the decline in
tourism, this meant more time to spend money.
The introduction of tickets led several writers to compare the experience to a Disney ride
(Usborne, 2002; Campbell, 2002). Moreover, the area surrounding Ground Zero took on signs of
a theme park as vendors began selling merchandise related to the tragedy including framed
photos of the wreckage and New York Fire Department caps. A report in the Christian Science
Monitor noted a visitor from Chicago who complained that the souvenir stands were profiting off
misery. One vendor seemed to agree with this sentiment: ’"Maybe there should be a moratorium
on vending around here, at least for a week or two" . . . So why does he keep selling? "We have
to feed our families," says Mr. Booker, a father of three in Harlem and an acquaintance of
vendors who died on Sept. 11’ (MacDonald, 2002). In other words, while visitors are consuming
images of Ground Zero, the jobs that depend on tourists require that these visitors make
purchases to go along with their images. This is how a tourist attraction functions as part of the
economy, and Ground Zero had become an official tourist attraction.
The transformation of Ground Zero into a tourist attraction perfectly illustrates how
locations can develop deep significance through their representation in the media. Ground Zero
had been shaped for visual consumption. As one visitor commented, ’You see it on television all
the time. Seeing it in person is very different’ (quoted in Givhan, 2001). The Internet adds a new
dynamic to the visual construction of the location because even if television coverage declines
and city officials try to shift the focus to other attractions, people can continue to pursue their
interest online. While the ’New York Miracle’ ad campaign was promoting Macy’s Thanksgiving
Day Parade, Yahoo! was creating a category of ’first hand photos of the WTC and Pentagon
attack’ that contained over 30 sites, each with multiple pictures. People could now browse over


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 12 of 31   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.