All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Visiting the Borderless City: Traveling via the Internet
Unformatted Document Text:  ability to link to another Web site shows how activists can use the Internet to take advantage of the resources designed for traditional tourists as well as supply links and information created just for the visiting protestor. In sum, these sites are promoting the city in ways similar to a typical travel Web site: they provide information on what to do, where to stay, and what to eat. However, the portrait of the city created on these sites is probably not one city officials would choose. While Ground Zero provided an example of how the Internet may encourage the development of tourist attractions the city reluctantly appropriates, the Anti-WEF protests show how the Internet can circulate unwanted meanings around an event that the city wanted--indeed, an event the city promoted as aiding tourism. The World Wide Web provided alternative interpretations of the event for protestors. So, instead of only seeing the dominant media depictions of the forum as a symbolic boost to the city’s prestige, protestors could see the forum depicted as a symbol of unregulated corporate power--the consequences of which are massive poverty and environmental destruction. Naturally, this shaped how they experienced the city when they came to visit: instead of lounging in the comfortable atmosphere of luxury hotels and shopping at upscale boutiques, they worked to make these spaces uncomfortable to be in. In short, one might characterize their presence as not just ’postmodern’ tourism but oppositional tourism. Conclusion The World Wide Web provides easy access to information for those who are interested in aspects of a city beyond what a convention and visitors bureau promotes, and people may come to visit a city for a great variety of reasons developed through exploration online. These pursuits may affect the city in a way different from traditional tourism. How much unconventional tourism will have an impact on cities or whether this impact will be significantly different from

Authors: Fotsch, Paul.
first   previous   Page 18 of 31   next   last



background image
ability to link to another Web site shows how activists can use the Internet to take advantage of
the resources designed for traditional tourists as well as supply links and information created just
for the visiting protestor. In sum, these sites are promoting the city in ways similar to a typical
travel Web site: they provide information on what to do, where to stay, and what to eat.
However, the portrait of the city created on these sites is probably not one city officials
would choose. While Ground Zero provided an example of how the Internet may encourage the
development of tourist attractions the city reluctantly appropriates, the Anti-WEF protests show
how the Internet can circulate unwanted meanings around an event that the city wanted--indeed,
an event the city promoted as aiding tourism. The World Wide Web provided alternative
interpretations of the event for protestors. So, instead of only seeing the dominant media
depictions of the forum as a symbolic boost to the city’s prestige, protestors could see the forum
depicted as a symbol of unregulated corporate power--the consequences of which are massive
poverty and environmental destruction. Naturally, this shaped how they experienced the city
when they came to visit: instead of lounging in the comfortable atmosphere of luxury hotels and
shopping at upscale boutiques, they worked to make these spaces uncomfortable to be in. In
short, one might characterize their presence as not just ’postmodern’ tourism but oppositional
tourism.
Conclusion
The World Wide Web provides easy access to information for those who are interested in
aspects of a city beyond what a convention and visitors bureau promotes, and people may come
to visit a city for a great variety of reasons developed through exploration online. These pursuits
may affect the city in a way different from traditional tourism. How much unconventional
tourism will have an impact on cities or whether this impact will be significantly different from


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 18 of 31   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.