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Visiting the Borderless City: Traveling via the Internet
Unformatted Document Text:  4 . According to the World Travel and Tourism Council, tourism accounts for 17 million jobs in the United States or almost 12.4% of all employees (World Travel & Tourism Council, 2001). 5 . Not everybody believes that dedicating resources to tourism is a viable way to revitalize an urban economy. Some cities have found significant opposition to tourist related projects. For example, in 1998 the Seattle City Council refused to endorse a bid for the 2012 Summer Olympics because they did not believe the added tourist revenues would necessarily make up for the expense of hosting the games (Modie, 1998). 6 . As David Harvey (1989) puts it, ’That [cities] should be so pressed, and that the result should be a serial repetition of successful models (such as Baltimore’s Harbor Place), is understandable, given the grim history of deindustrialization and restructuring that left most major cities in the advanced capitalist world with few options except to compete with each other, mainly as financial, consumption, and entertainment centres ’ (92). 7 . A somewhat different tactic is found approximately 150 miles south of Las Vegas in Lake Havasu City, Arizona. Here perhaps the most unusual example of importing another city’s history can be found. In 1968, the London Bridge, which was collapsing into the Thames, was brought to Arizona and rebuilt to span part of Lake Havasu. A small group of British themed shops have been constructed around the bridge in a place that can average well over 110 degrees in the summer--very much unlike the city it is meant to imitate. 8 . Boyer comments on the products with maritime themes to be found at South Street Seaport in New York: ’Even in stylized and generic form, the further these commodities lie from everyday reality--the more they accessorize the fantasy narrative of exploration/discover/colonization--the greater their allure and the more they seem to address some need for authentic and novel experience’ (203).

Authors: Fotsch, Paul.
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4
. According to the World Travel and Tourism Council, tourism accounts for 17 million jobs in
the United States or almost 12.4% of all employees (World Travel & Tourism Council, 2001).
5
. Not everybody believes that dedicating resources to tourism is a viable way to revitalize an
urban economy. Some cities have found significant opposition to tourist related projects. For
example, in 1998 the Seattle City Council refused to endorse a bid for the 2012 Summer
Olympics because they did not believe the added tourist revenues would necessarily make up for
the expense of hosting the games (Modie, 1998).
6
. As David Harvey (1989) puts it, ’That [cities] should be so pressed, and that the result should
be a serial repetition of successful models (such as Baltimore’s Harbor Place), is understandable,
given the grim history of deindustrialization and restructuring that left most major cities in the
advanced capitalist world with few options except to compete with each other, mainly as
financial, consumption, and entertainment centres ’ (92).
7
. A somewhat different tactic is found approximately 150 miles south of Las Vegas in Lake
Havasu City, Arizona. Here perhaps the most unusual example of importing another city’s
history can be found. In 1968, the London Bridge, which was collapsing into the Thames, was
brought to Arizona and rebuilt to span part of Lake Havasu. A small group of British themed
shops have been constructed around the bridge in a place that can average well over 110 degrees
in the summer--very much unlike the city it is meant to imitate.
8
. Boyer comments on the products with maritime themes to be found at South Street Seaport in
New York: ’Even in stylized and generic form, the further these commodities lie from everyday
reality--the more they accessorize the fantasy narrative of exploration/discover/colonization--the
greater their allure and the more they seem to address some need for authentic and novel
experience’ (203).


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