All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Visiting the Borderless City: Traveling via the Internet
Unformatted Document Text:  leads to increased rents, and is accompanied by a corresponding breakdown in community structure, including ethnicity, as families and individuals are forced to relocate’ (162). The effects of tourism on local residents can be dramatic when a major event comes to a city, so, for example, ’in the case of the 1986 Vancouver Expo, 600 tenants were evicted including long-term, low-income residents from hotels near the Expo site’ (Hall, 1994: 162). Even without a major event, tourism promotion can facilitate gentrification. 9 The types of upscale boutiques and restaurants meant to appeal to tourists are also more appealing to the upper middle class who might choose to move in to a redeveloped neighborhood. However, shopping areas that cater to tourists may also be problematic for upper class residents because they often lack grocery stores and pharmacies that carry everyday necessities (Judd, 1999: 49). In general, tourist districts replace businesses that served a local clientele with businesses oriented toward conventional middle class tastes. 10 The Web and Urban Tourism In many ways the Internet can be viewed as contributing to the increased standardization of cities. Travel Web sites such as Travelocity, Expedia and Orbitz are most effective in quickly translating diverse destinations into familiar packages. The central component on the home page of these sites is a round trip flight search. These reduce cities to the cost of flying to them. 11 Before or after selecting a flight, travelers can conduct a search for hotels in the city of interest. For each hotel a standardized description of its amenities is provided, and its neighborhood is reduced to ’shopping nearby’ or the distance from major tourist attractions such as Seaworld or Old Town in San Diego. Web sites also allow visitors to limit their search to hotels of a particular chain or of a particular hotel class ranging from luxury to economy. The

Authors: Fotsch, Paul.
first   previous   Page 4 of 31   next   last



background image
leads to increased rents, and is accompanied by a corresponding breakdown in community
structure, including ethnicity, as families and individuals are forced to relocate’ (162). The
effects of tourism on local residents can be dramatic when a major event comes to a city, so, for
example, ’in the case of the 1986 Vancouver Expo, 600 tenants were evicted including long-term,
low-income residents from hotels near the Expo site’ (Hall, 1994: 162). Even without a major
event, tourism promotion can facilitate gentrification.
9
The types of upscale boutiques and
restaurants meant to appeal to tourists are also more appealing to the upper middle class who
might choose to move in to a redeveloped neighborhood. However, shopping areas that cater to
tourists may also be problematic for upper class residents because they often lack grocery stores
and pharmacies that carry everyday necessities (Judd, 1999: 49). In general, tourist districts
replace businesses that served a local clientele with businesses oriented toward conventional
middle class tastes.
10
The Web and Urban Tourism
In many ways the Internet can be viewed as contributing to the increased standardization
of cities. Travel Web sites such as Travelocity, Expedia and Orbitz are most effective in quickly
translating diverse destinations into familiar packages. The central component on the home page
of these sites is a round trip flight search. These reduce cities to the cost of flying to them.
11
Before or after selecting a flight, travelers can conduct a search for hotels in the city of interest.
For each hotel a standardized description of its amenities is provided, and its neighborhood is
reduced to ’shopping nearby’ or the distance from major tourist attractions such as Seaworld or
Old Town in San Diego. Web sites also allow visitors to limit their search to hotels of a
particular chain or of a particular hotel class ranging from luxury to economy. The


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 31   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.