All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Backwards Up Niagara Falls: Space/Time, Image/Text and the Biases of Information
Unformatted Document Text:  20 What this represents is not just the loss of temporal continuity, of cause and effect, of development and duration, that mutually anchor processes of production, communication technologies, symbolic forms and contexts of reception. This is not the simple ‘triumph’ of space over time. Instead, the atomization, discontinuity and transferability so central to the informational model are also connected to the depletion of spatial (particularly geographical) moorings, producing a new kind of compressed and relational space-time which stresses the importance of propulsion from point to point. A move, in short, from place to flow. Place-Flow: Manuel Castells is among the very few commentators on the information age to explicitly, albeit briefly, acknowledge the influence of Innis (1996: 460). Among his key claims in The Rise of the Network Society (1996) is that the dominant form of contemporary spatial organization, as it crystallizes social structure and cultural experience, can be characterized as ‘the space of flows’. Opposed to the space of places, the physical organization of social communities around geographical places with specific narrative histories and identities, the space of flows describes a mobile, purely relational space of interconnections. A particular location – such as a city or a website – acquires its value and its identity from its function in a network, in relation to all other nodes through which traffic (money, people, information) passes. Without historical narrative or geographical singularity, the space of flows is also the space of placeless instantaneousness, in which transfers occur in a ‘timeless time’ of simultaneity without duration or boundedness – a condition that Innis would have linked to the ‘present-mindedness’ with which he charged modern societies. It is worth briefly enumerating some of the traces of the space of flows. With respect to the representational modes of media, Raymond Williams (1990) famously described the chief characteristic of television as sequence or flow, linking it to mobile privatization and suburbanization. However, public broadcast television, in the age of what we quaintly refer to as spectrum scarcity, was also very much modeled as a kind of place – the place of Benedict

Authors: Frosh, Paul.
first   previous   Page 20 of 31   next   last



background image
20
What this represents is not just the loss of temporal continuity, of cause and effect, of
development and duration, that mutually anchor processes of production, communication
technologies, symbolic forms and contexts of reception. This is not the simple ‘triumph’ of
space over time. Instead, the atomization, discontinuity and transferability so central to the
informational model are also connected to the depletion of spatial (particularly geographical)
moorings, producing a new kind of compressed and relational space-time which stresses the
importance of propulsion from point to point. A move, in short, from place to flow.
Place-Flow: Manuel Castells is among the very few commentators on the information
age to explicitly, albeit briefly, acknowledge the influence of Innis (1996: 460). Among his
key claims in The Rise of the Network Society (1996) is that the dominant form of
contemporary spatial organization, as it crystallizes social structure and cultural experience,
can be characterized as ‘the space of flows’. Opposed to the space of places, the physical
organization of social communities around geographical places with specific narrative
histories and identities, the space of flows describes a mobile, purely relational space of
interconnections. A particular location – such as a city or a website – acquires its value and its
identity from its function in a network, in relation to all other nodes through which traffic
(money, people, information) passes. Without historical narrative or geographical singularity,
the space of flows is also the space of placeless instantaneousness, in which transfers occur in
a ‘timeless time’ of simultaneity without duration or boundedness – a condition that Innis
would have linked to the ‘present-mindedness’ with which he charged modern societies.
It is worth briefly enumerating some of the traces of the space of flows. With respect to
the representational modes of media, Raymond Williams (1990) famously described the chief
characteristic of television as sequence or flow, linking it to mobile privatization and
suburbanization. However, public broadcast television, in the age of what we quaintly refer to
as spectrum scarcity, was also very much modeled as a kind of place – the place of Benedict


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 20 of 31   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.