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Businessmen, Partisans and Oligarchs: Political Control, News Production Philosophies And Partisan Bias In Mexican Television News

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Abstract:

Even minimal definitions of democracy recognize that access to information about political candidates is a necessary component of “free and fair” elections, but electoral competition and economic liberalization do not by themselves guarantee more politically plural coverage. In our examination of the most-frequently cited source of political news, television, we find that the worldviews of station owners or state TV directors – the businessmen, partisans and oligarchs who make up today’s television elite in the developing world – determine how biased the news will remain as a new democracy consolidates. Their news decisions are based in part on instrumental calculations of how to profit economically or politically in a new macro-environment. But they are also influenced by authoritarian inertia and distinctive philosophies of news production. Thus, we argue, policy debates about state or private sector ownership miss the heart of the matter. For partisan bias to end, newsrooms must be controlled by people dedicated to political pluralism in the news, but those newsrooms can be constructed within either the state or the private sector just as they can both be captured by partisan interests. Although our quantitative analysis and case studies are drawn from Mexico, our conclusions should be relevant for a range of new democracies

Most Common Document Word Stems:

state (180), station (129), news (112), televis (92), parti (87), mexico (82), coverag (82), pri (73), de (68), polit (66), broadcast (65), n (63), 2000 (59), control (50), govern (48), governor (47), privat (47), own (47), media (47), bias (45), 2002 (43),

Author's Keywords:

Democratization; Media And Politics; News Bias
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MLA Citation:

Hughes, Sallie. and Lawson, Chappell. "Businessmen, Partisans and Oligarchs: Political Control, News Production Philosophies And Partisan Bias In Mexican Television News" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p112287_index.html>

APA Citation:

Hughes, S. L. and Lawson, C. , 2003-05-27 "Businessmen, Partisans and Oligarchs: Political Control, News Production Philosophies And Partisan Bias In Mexican Television News" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p112287_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Even minimal definitions of democracy recognize that access to information about political candidates is a necessary component of “free and fair” elections, but electoral competition and economic liberalization do not by themselves guarantee more politically plural coverage. In our examination of the most-frequently cited source of political news, television, we find that the worldviews of station owners or state TV directors – the businessmen, partisans and oligarchs who make up today’s television elite in the developing world – determine how biased the news will remain as a new democracy consolidates. Their news decisions are based in part on instrumental calculations of how to profit economically or politically in a new macro-environment. But they are also influenced by authoritarian inertia and distinctive philosophies of news production. Thus, we argue, policy debates about state or private sector ownership miss the heart of the matter. For partisan bias to end, newsrooms must be controlled by people dedicated to political pluralism in the news, but those newsrooms can be constructed within either the state or the private sector just as they can both be captured by partisan interests. Although our quantitative analysis and case studies are drawn from Mexico, our conclusions should be relevant for a range of new democracies

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 42
Word count: 11964
Text sample:
Businessmen Partisans and Oligarchs: Political Control News Production Philosophies and Partisan Bias in Mexican Television News A Paper Submitted to the Annual Conference of the International Communication Association May 23-27 San Diego CA USA 2 For citizens really to be able to vote freely the organization of elections must give political contenders a margin of equity in aspects such as access to the communication media especially to television. If this margin of equity between the political parties and candidates
Nubia And Manuela Olivos. Relación De Actos Contra El Ejercicio Periodistico Ocurridos En México De Enero a Diciembre De 1999. Fraternidad De Reporteros 1999. Accessed July 15 2002. Internet. Available from www.fremac.org.mx/obs/inf99/recue3.html. Sánchez Ruiz Enrique. “Fin del antiguo regimen televisivo ” Reforma 18 January 1998. The Special Rapporteur For Freedom Of Expression. Preliminary Evaluation of Freedom of Expression in Guatemala. Guatemala City Guatemala: Organization Of American States 2002. Press Release PREN/24/00. Weissert Will. "Miami-Based Businessman Controls Big Chunk of


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