All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

A Dialectic With the Everyday: Communication & Cultural Politics on Oprah Winfrey's Book Club
Unformatted Document Text:  Oprah Winfrey’s Book Club 20 in actual events and the experiences of a woman who had overcome emotionally and psychologically trying circumstances. Winfrey had already touched on the actuality of Vinegar Hill when she announced its selection for Oprah’s Book Club a month earlier. “[T]he author does a really outstanding job of showing us a real-life family and common problems,” she observed. “When I finished, I thought, ‘We need to get that family on The Oprah Show’” (Anne Murray and her daughter’s battle with anorexia , 1999, p. 17). Ironically, this is almost exactly what happened during the televised discussion of Vinegar Hill in December. Oprah producers temporarily broke with the tradition of inviting four or five guests to discuss the book over dinner with Winfrey and the author, opting instead to invite married women and their mothers-in-law to the studio to share how their relationships with one another and their families had been affected by living together. And while the program featured both married women and their mothers-in-law, like Vinegar Hill it generally privileged the stories and perspectives of the former. One guest of the program, a woman named Valerie, explained that she was “amazed at how similar Ellen’s experience was to something that happened to [her] 18 years ago,” when she was forced to move in with her mother-in- law while her husband completed a degree (Oprah’s book club, 1999, December 3, p. 14). Later, the program featured a segment in which Cherie Burton of Salt Lake City, UT and her mother-in-law discussed the tensions that flowed from Cherie and her husband’s moving in with his parents eight months earlier. Like Valerie, Cherie seemed to identify with the character, Ellen Grier. “I wouldn’t say if feels like a prison here,” she indicated, “but there are some moments where I do feel trapped” (Oprah’s book club, 1999, December 3, p. 6). Indeed, The Oprah Winfrey Show routinely featured letters and stories from women readers who connected the narratives/characters of specific Book Club selections directly to their own experiences and everyday lives. One viewer/reader named Connie, for instance, wrote in to the show after reading Mary McGarry Morris’ Songs in Ordinary Time to express the uncanniness she felt while reading the book:

Authors: Striphas, Theodore.
first   previous   Page 20 of 32   next   last



background image
Oprah Winfrey’s Book Club
20
in actual events and the experiences of a woman who had overcome emotionally and psychologically
trying circumstances.
Winfrey had already touched on the actuality of Vinegar Hill when she announced its
selection for Oprah’s Book Club a month earlier. “[T]he author does a really outstanding job of
showing us a real-life family and common problems,” she observed. “When I finished, I thought, ‘We
need to get that family on The Oprah Show’” (Anne Murray and her daughter’s battle with anorexia
,
1999, p. 17). Ironically, this is almost exactly what happened during the televised discussion of
Vinegar Hill in December. Oprah producers temporarily broke with the tradition of inviting four or
five guests to discuss the book over dinner with Winfrey and the author, opting instead to invite
married women and their mothers-in-law to the studio to share how their relationships with one
another and their families had been affected by living together.
And while the program featured both married women and their mothers-in-law, like Vinegar
Hill it generally privileged the stories and perspectives of the former. One guest of the program, a
woman named Valerie, explained that she was “amazed at how similar Ellen’s experience was to
something that happened to [her] 18 years ago,” when she was forced to move in with her mother-in-
law while her husband completed a degree (Oprah’s book club, 1999, December 3, p. 14). Later, the
program featured a segment in which Cherie Burton of Salt Lake City, UT and her mother-in-law
discussed the tensions that flowed from Cherie and her husband’s moving in with his parents eight
months earlier. Like Valerie, Cherie seemed to identify with the character, Ellen Grier. “I wouldn’t
say if feels like a prison here,” she indicated, “but there are some moments where I do feel trapped”
(Oprah’s book club, 1999, December 3, p. 6).
Indeed,
The Oprah Winfrey Show routinely featured letters and stories from women readers
who connected the narratives/characters of specific Book Club selections directly to their own
experiences and everyday lives. One viewer/reader named Connie, for instance, wrote in to the show
after reading Mary McGarry Morris’ Songs in Ordinary Time to express the uncanniness she felt
while reading the book:


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 20 of 32   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.