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Businessmen, Partisans and Oligarchs: Political Control, News Production Philosophies And Partisan Bias In Mexican Television News
Unformatted Document Text:  21 the second half of the campaign (May through June) for each broadcast. Unfortunately, the IFE data are not broken out to this level of detail; only state-level data is provided for different time periods. However, by examining which states are dominated by government-owned broadcasts, it is possible to evaluate the impact of political pressure. To this end, we categorize states according to whether the bulk of airtime monitored by the IFE was broadcast on government- owned stations. We then consider which party controlled power in that state. Thus, we are left with two states dominated by PRD-run public broadcasts (Baja California Sur and Tlaxcala), two states dominated by PAN-run broadcasts (Aguascalientes and Guanajuato), and eleven states dominated by PRI-run broadcasts (Campeche, Colima, Hidalgo, Mexico, Michoacan, Morelos, Oaxaca, Sinaloa, Sonora, Tabasco, and Veracruz). Table 3 reports the change in coverage of the PRI on each type of state. Table 3: Change in Coverage Across Different States PRI share of coverage Jan.-April PRI share of coverage May-June Increase State broadcasts in PRI states 44.6 55.6 11.0 State broadcasts in PAN states 27.9 31.0 3.1 State broadcasts in PRD states 28.3 32.9 4.6 Private broadcasts in the national capital 28.9 25.8 -3.1 All states 41.8 49.1 7.3 As the table shows, coverage of the PRI increased during the second half of the race in all states outside the capital. In all states, on average, the PRI received about 7.3% more coverage after the first debate than it did before, despite the fact that Labastida’s standing in the polls declined. However, coverage of the ruling party surged the most (11%) in PRI-controlled states with government-owned stations. By contrast, it changed little in opposition-controlled states

Authors: Hughes, Sallie. and Lawson, Chappell.
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the second half of the campaign (May through June) for each broadcast. Unfortunately, the IFE
data are not broken out to this level of detail; only state-level data is provided for different time
periods. However, by examining which states are dominated by government-owned broadcasts,
it is possible to evaluate the impact of political pressure. To this end, we categorize states
according to whether the bulk of airtime monitored by the IFE was broadcast on government-
owned stations. We then consider which party controlled power in that state. Thus, we are left
with two states dominated by PRD-run public broadcasts (Baja California Sur and Tlaxcala), two
states dominated by PAN-run broadcasts (Aguascalientes and Guanajuato), and eleven states
dominated by PRI-run broadcasts (Campeche, Colima, Hidalgo, Mexico, Michoacan, Morelos,
Oaxaca, Sinaloa, Sonora, Tabasco, and Veracruz). Table 3 reports the change in coverage of the
PRI on each type of state.
Table 3: Change in Coverage Across Different States
PRI share of coverage
Jan.-April
PRI share of coverage
May-June
Increase
State broadcasts in PRI states
44.6
55.6
11.0
State broadcasts in PAN states
27.9
31.0
3.1
State broadcasts in PRD states
28.3
32.9
4.6
Private broadcasts in the
national capital
28.9 25.8
-3.1
All states
41.8
49.1
7.3
As the table shows, coverage of the PRI increased during the second half of the race in all
states outside the capital. In all states, on average, the PRI received about 7.3% more coverage
after the first debate than it did before, despite the fact that Labastida’s standing in the polls
declined. However, coverage of the ruling party surged the most (11%) in PRI-controlled states
with government-owned stations. By contrast, it changed little in opposition-controlled states


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