All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Businessmen, Partisans and Oligarchs: Political Control, News Production Philosophies And Partisan Bias In Mexican Television News
Unformatted Document Text:  30 private sector stations in our sample? Would private ownership guarantee lower levels of partisan bias in local television news? News bias was lower on aggregate in privately owned stations, but it still persisted. Our examination of three private sector news stations suggests that the principal reason bias persists or declines in private sector stations is the same as in state-owned news stations. The person with power in the organization, in this case the owner instead of the governor, decides whether news will or will not be biased. Whether or not news programming demonstrates significant bias depends on the mental model of news production held by the station’s owner, or CEO. As Epstein found in his study of U.S. television news, and Fernández and Paxman posit in their biography of late Televisa mogul Emilio Azcárraga, perpetuating the owner’s vision of news does not require daily, direct intervention in the newsroom. It is transferred through personnel selection, socialization, and selective rewards and punishments, although occasionally the errant journalist is chastised. 35 The mental models of the owners in our sample responded to civic, market-driven and oligarchic visions of news production. Baja California’s Channel 66 The history of Channel 66 in Mexicali, Baja California, highlights the founding family’s vision of journalism as a force for community service, outsider status, and tenacity in the face of the inequalities of Mexico’s media politics. The network’s “founding culture,” as management theorist Edgar Schein calls it, 36 was unique in our sample. Also unique was the fact that the IFE 35 Edward Jay Epstein, News from Nowhere. Television and the News (New York: Random House, 1973). Claudia Fernández and Andrew Paxman, El Tigre. Emilio Azcárraga Y Su Imperio Televisa (Mexico, D.F.: Editorial Grijalbo, 2000). 36 Edgar H. Schein, Organizational Culture and Leadership (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1985).

Authors: Hughes, Sallie. and Lawson, Chappell.
first   previous   Page 30 of 42   next   last



background image
30
private sector stations in our sample? Would private ownership guarantee lower levels of
partisan bias in local television news?
News bias was lower on aggregate in privately owned stations, but it still persisted. Our
examination of three private sector news stations suggests that the principal reason bias persists
or declines in private sector stations is the same as in state-owned news stations. The person with
power in the organization, in this case the owner instead of the governor, decides whether news
will or will not be biased.
Whether or not news programming demonstrates significant bias depends on the mental
model of news production held by the station’s owner, or CEO. As Epstein found in his study of
U.S. television news, and Fernández and Paxman posit in their biography of late Televisa mogul
Emilio Azcárraga, perpetuating the owner’s vision of news does not require daily, direct
intervention in the newsroom. It is transferred through personnel selection, socialization, and
selective rewards and punishments, although occasionally the errant journalist is chastised.
35
The mental models of the owners in our sample responded to civic, market-driven and oligarchic
visions of news production.
Baja California’s Channel 66
The history of Channel 66 in Mexicali, Baja California, highlights the founding family’s
vision of journalism as a force for community service, outsider status, and tenacity in the face of
the inequalities of Mexico’s media politics. The network’s “founding culture,” as management
theorist Edgar Schein calls it,
36
was unique in our sample. Also unique was the fact that the IFE
35
Edward Jay Epstein, News from Nowhere. Television and the News (New York: Random House, 1973). Claudia
Fernández and Andrew Paxman, El Tigre. Emilio Azcárraga Y Su Imperio Televisa (Mexico, D.F.: Editorial
Grijalbo, 2000).
36
Edgar H. Schein, Organizational Culture and Leadership (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1985).


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 30 of 42   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.